About Duanne Olivier and my Wife!

As you well know, in-form South African paceman Duanne Olivier has packed his bags for the land of tea, water and Emmerdale… Yorkshire!

That move is disappointing in itself. I’m a Yorkshireman but maintain romantic notions when it comes to international sport. I’d like to see a top player want to perform for his/her country.

The quota system in South Africa probably requires a post of its own. Maybe I don’t even understand it properly.

Olivier, capped ten times at Test level, now says that he wants to play for England. Well I don’t want him to! Does that make me xenophobic and/or a hypocrite? Possibly.

My wife is not from England. She has come to this country and worked here, therefore potentially denying a willing English person that job. Regardless of Olivier denying an Englishman a place in the Yorkshire team or enhancing the quality of the league, he has represented South Africa as an adult. My opinion is that once you’ve made your bed then you must lie in it.

I can understand sportsmen and women switching allegiance from junior level. Nationality is not always as simple as people being born in one country to parents both from said country and being brought up there until adulthood. My daughters are English born to an English father but will still be exposed to a lot of French culture and language here in England before we even consider their visits to France. If they become athletes, I’d have no qualms about them representing France. Of course Jofra Archer, despite having an English parent (And see KP etc) has to qualify to play for England.

Of course there are many previous examples all with varying circumstances but I’m very uncomfortable with the possibility of Olivier pulling on an England shirt.

I have absolutely no problem with a person from any country living and working, including next door or alongside me, in this country but if they relocated as an adult then I wouldn’t expect them to represent our nation at international sport. If I lived in any other country, I wouldn’t say that I was that nationality just because I’d spent two thirds of each of three years living and working there.

There’s an argument that international sport needn’t exist. That we shouldn’t divide ourselves in such ways. There’s no balance between populations, it’s just politics and land grabbing. But if international sport does exist, I don’t think that you can change your mind in your late twenties and switch allegiance. My wife might gain British citizenship but she’ll have been here a lot longer than Olivier.

That’s my piece and I’ve said it.

Cricket Captain 2018: Four Hundreds!

 

A completely random post of an epic batting effort by my team in my Afghanistan career mode on CC18.

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Imran actually finished 69 not out in the first dig only to be run out second time around.

I’ve scored higher team totals as well as having a few players chalk up sizeable double tons during my Afghanistan efforts but even in my England careers over the years, I don’t think that I’ve achieved four centuries in one innings!

Disclaimer: It wasn’t Tim Paine bowling!

CricketXI: IPL 2019

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Hi followers

Above is my CricketXI fantasy team for this year’s edition of the IPL.

Feel free to join my 2019 IPL Morris Invitational League at…

https://cricketxi.com

If required the join code is OQQZBKBF

Don’t forget that I’ve created two other Leagues, 2019 CC Morris Invitational and 2019 ODC Morris Invitational for the County Championship and One-Day Cup in England. If you win then you might see your name in bright lights on this site. That’s the best prize I can offer, oh and maybe I’ll provide the link to your blog… a free hit if you will!

Many thanks and happy blogging!

Numbers Up!

Numbers on shirts during the Ashes. Farewell tradition!

Now obviously players participating in the County Championship wear numbers on their shirts and I can understand the logic in that. In Test match cricket though, I’m not so sure. Beamed on TV players are easily identifiable and even for those at the ground, isn’t trying to figure out the identity of the players part of the beauty of attending? The scoreboard will tell you who is batting and bowling. You know who the wicketkeeper is and can soon figure out regular field placements.

I think that the qualities of both Test and T20I cricket are enhanced by maintaining as much difference between them as possible. Keep the flashing bails, coloured clothing and names on shirts away from the most testing form of the game please.

Oh, errr, ignore my custom kit creation in the pic above… hypocrite!

For Whom the Bell Tolls!

Warwickshire stalwart Ian Bell will miss the first three months of the county campaign because of a toe injury sustained during the PSL. The 36-year-old’s chances of gatecrashing the Ashes now appear even slimmer than the own brand lasagne sheet that they already were!

If you were lining up Bell as a vital component of your fantasy cricket batting line-up then you’ll need to perform a rethink… James Hildreth anyone?

A Moan About WordPress

I’ve noticed, but forgot to do something about it when I posted my last article, that often when you publish an article you’ve drafted a long time ago, it slots in on the date that you first created the draft. You then have to manually change the date and as a result, I don’t think that it shows up on the Reader so you miss out on potential views.

I’ve previously provided tips based on my blogging experiences and of course want to maximise exposure and views etc received. This little nuisance is particularly annoying!

James Astill: The Great Tamasha Book Review

As with Peter Oborne’s A History of Cricket in Pakistan, when reading James Astill’s The Great Tamasha, not only do you learn about cricket but the country as a whole.

Firstly, let’s get the criticism out of the way. Occasionally Astill dismisses the careers of some domestic players whose batting averages weren’t particularly lofty. Whilst he draws attention to the fact that many players were presented with opportunities that they didn’t merit, one or two mentioned deserve a little more respect. There are ranges in people’s abilities in all walks of life and not every batsman in Indian domestic cricket can average north of sixty.

Moving on, what rings true in Astill’s work is that he’s clearly immersed himself in local culture. He’s lived and breathed the streets, slums and cricket fields of India and not just the tourist spots. Astill performed many interviews with folk who are or were involved in the game at all levels of the cricket spectrum. It is interesting to have read this book five or six years since publication. The IPL is clearly still very much part of the cricket calendar even though there was great uncertainty and controversy during and before the time of writing.

Lalit Modi courts a lot of page time as do the owners of the IPL franchises. Astill’s explanations of why Indian’s watch cricket and their reasons for doing so are particularly insightful.

For enthusiastic fans of the global game, this is essential reading and scores…

84 not out