Cricket 19: Squad Announcement

The France squad for the two-match Test tour of Australia is:

Jean-Luc Chevalier (Vice-captain)

Enzo Petit

Gilles Smith

Youssef Rizvi

Zvonimir Pitko

Zidane Thomas

Marwan Leroy (Wicketkeeper)

Xavier Le Tallec (Captain)

Paco Georges

Louis Martin

Mehdi Qadri

Omar Sissoko

Christophe Martínez*

Maurice Noe

Maxime Bernard (Wicketkeeper)

Louis Petit

Phillipe La Roux*

Anthony Toure

*At the conclusion of the scheduled warm-up fixture Christophe Martinez and Phillipe La Roux will each join a Sydney based club side. We’d like to place on record our gratitude for the co-operation of the local amateur league and anticipate that the agreement will be mutually beneficial. This deal is subject to change however and messrs Martinez and La Roux can be called up to the Test squad at any time.

Itinerary

First Class warm-up fixture (Perth)

1st Test (Perth)

2nd Test (Sydney)

The France squad for the one-off T20I against Australia is:

Jean-Luc Chevalier (Vice-captain)

Hippolyte Gregory*

Christophe Martínez

Matteo Phillipe*

Zvonimir Pitko

Zidane Thomas

Marwan Leroy (Wicketkeeper)

Xavier Le Tallec (Captain)

Louis Petit

Paco Georges

Phillipe La Roux

Maxime Bernard (Wicketkeeper)

Anthony Toure

Mehdi Qadri

*Hippolyte Gregory and Matteo Phillipe will both attend a Sydney based five-day conditioning camp prior to the T20/T20I fixtures. The T20I squad is subject to change following the demands/workload of the Test series.

Itinerary

T20 warm-up fixture (Sydney)

Only T20I (Sydney)

Cricket 19: Down on the Delhi Deck!

Following our ground-breaking success in the mountains, we named an unchanged side for the second Test on a dust bowl in Delhi. We lost the toss and as was the case in Doon, were inserted to field first. India progressed rapidly to 43-0 but we really should’ve taken a wicket. Louis Martin, brimming with confidence after his second innings figures of 3-91 in the Himalayas, executed a ferocious short ball that Rohit Sharma couldn’t resist. The trap was set but Zidane Thomas, stationed at fine leg, neglected to commit to the catch. Thomas soon made amends however when he caught Sharma (20) dawdling out of his crease and effected an extremely cheeky run out. Cheteshawara Pujara, fresh from striking a century in the first Test, made 21 before edging spinner Mehdi Qadri to Gilles Smith at slip. Despite losing two wickets, India had clocked up 109 runs by lunch.

Just three deliveries after the interval, Qadri was it it again, ousting Indian skipper Virat Kohli (14) courtesy of a superb catch by Zvonimir Pitko at point. Qadri later appealed for LBW against Agarwal, on 78 at the time. We opted not to review but replays showed that Agarwal would’ve been given out had we’d done so. How costly would that be?

Not very! Suddenly Agarwal endured a torrid time against the turn of Qadri and Louis Petit but survived until drinks. In the second over post beverages, Le Tallec (1-31) rolled his arm over and the captain promptly castled Agarwal’s stumps. As in the first Test Agarwal (84) couldn’t reach three figures. India recovered though and by tea were 217-4 with Rahane passing fifty and the partnership with Vihari doing the same.

In the second over after tea and with his first ball of a new spell, Louis Petit accounted for Rahane’s (52) middle stump. He then did for Pant (5) courtesy of a throw from the boundary as the hosts just couldn’t kick their run out habit!

Ravi Jadeja (8) dug in alongside Vihari but then needlessly chased a wide delivery and feathered an edge to wicketkeeper Marwan Leroy. Tactical genius Le Tallec then opted against the new ball and Youssef Rizvi (1-8) immediately claimed Vihari (59) as his maiden Test victim.

In the penultimate over of the day Qadri (3-86) claimed the wicket of Ravi Ashwin (16), caught in the slips by Smith ala the Pujara dismissal. Ishant Sharma and Jasprit Bumrah survived until close with India upto 294-9.

Less than three overs were required on day two for the Indian innings to be curtailed. The astute Le Tallec took the new ball yet combined spin with pace and it paid off handsomely as Petit (3-57) had Sharma (13) caught by Pitko. India all out for 298 with all wickets bar run outs falling to spin.

In reply, Enzo Petit and Jean-Luc Chevalier compiled 74 for the first wicket before Petit (35) stepped too far across his stumps and was bowled behind his legs by Ashwin. Smith appeared to be caught at slip first ball but India neglected to review. At times unconvincing, he survived until drinks.

Chevalier brought up a second Test fifty then struck three boundaries before he misjudged a delivery from Ashwin. Despite the review confirming that the ball pitched and struck pad outside the line of off stump, Chevalier (62) had offered no shot so had to depart. It wasn’t long after Chevalier’s dismissal that Smith’s mixed bag of an innings came to an end. He was rather suckered into a trap, caught at leg slip off Jadeja for 23. Rizvi and Pitko took us to lunch on 141-3.

After the interval the pair progressed to 178-4 before Rizvi (13), like Chevalier, chose to leave a ball from Ashwin, only to look back in horror and see his stumps rearranged! Zidane Thomas then endured ten torturous deliveries before falling for single figures for the third time in the series. Thomas (4) was bowled through his legs by Jadeja (2-72). India then made a surprise bowling change bringing back the pace of Bumrah (2-68) and we promptly conceded yet another own goal. Pitko (45), who had batted so well, top edged an unnecessary pull shot onto his helmet and was caught by Pujara. Le Tallec (13) then produced a near identical dismissal only this time Rohit Sharma took the catch. 119-1 had become 216-7.

Marwan Leroy and Louis Petit seemed to be rebuilding with a partnership of 38 but Petit (10) was caught and bowled by Ishant Sharma (1-83). Leroy (38) was then caught at short leg off Ashwin as the collapse continued then terminated when Martin was LBW first ball. It was another five-wicket haul for Ashwin (5-29) as we slumped from 74-0 and 178-3 to 262 all out, still 36 shy of parity. Nearly all our batsmen made a start but poor selection (Or non-selection!) cost us a first innings lead.

Back with ball in hand, in eight overs before tea we were sloppy but also unlucky, edges going to the boundary rather than to hand. Thomas started to work Sharma over however and in a great example of bowling in tandem, Louis Martin lured Sharma (16) into a leading edge. The ever reliable Pitko lunged forward from gully to execute the catch. India 38-1, effectively 74-1 at tea on only the second day.

A period of frustration ensued as the hosts comfortably kicked onto 99-1. Captain Le Tallec brought himself into the attack though and Agarwal soon succumbed. Need I tell you who held the catch at short leg? For Agarwal (36) it was another contribution in the series without progressing to make a really sizeable score. Leader Le Tallec didn’t stop there as he soon accounted for his opposing number Kohli (11). There are no prizes for guessing correctly who took the catch!

India increased their lead but immediately after bringing up a half-century Pujara (51) was caught behind off Qadri. Not long after that, at 148-4 and the lead 184, day two drew to a close.

Rahane and Vihari built on their foundations to lay a fifty partnership before a change of bowling helped oust Rahane. As Thomas appealed for LBW against Vihari, the pair scampered through for a risky single. Rahane (40) appeared to have made his ground but his bat actually bounced off the ground just at the moment that Magic touch Le Tallec broke the bails. It was a well needed stroke of fortune just two deliveries before beverages.

Post thirst quenching Vihari upped the tempo alongside the aggressive Pant. At lunch on day three India had ascended to 269-5 with the lead ballooning to 305.

Finally, after the partnership had surpassed a hundred, Qadri ousted Vihari (91), caught behind by Leroy. Le Tallec then opted against the new ball and Perit had Pant (65) caught by Pitko, his fourth catch of the innings. At that point India were 325-7. Both batsmen had batted extremely well and put their team firmly in control. Jadeja and Ashwin then went about doing the same and lifted the score to 384-7 at tea on day three. By the time the next drinks break came around India were upto 440-7 courtesy of another century partnership. Our captain and bowling unit simply had no answer to Jadeja’s and Ashwin’s efforts.

Eventually Martin found an edge… that went through the slips for four to bring up the 150 partnership! At the close of play on the third day India, having been 207-5, were 498-7, the lead upto a monstrous 534. Jadeja would sleep on 99 not out, Ashwin not far behind on 80.

Two balls into day four and Jadeja nicked behind but the ball didn’t carry to Leroy. Next ball he brought up his ton but soon fell to Le Tallec for 101. Ashwin (112*) also recorded a century while Martin ousted Sharma (1) with a superb caught and bowled. Thomas then terminated the innings when he dismissed Bumrah (3), courtesy of a second catch of the morning for Leroy. Our bowling figures made for grim reading but we had at least performed well to curtail… the tail. Le Tallec (3-103), Martin (2-105), Qadri (2-100) and Petit (1-105) all brought up centuries of their own. Thomas (1-88) wasn’t far behind. India finished 537 all out meaning that we needed 573 to win. We had just under two days to bat and of course a draw would seal a first ever series win. Should we attempt to bat time for a stoic and epic draw or try to achieve the highest run chase in Test history… in only our fourth Test?

Fourteen overs into the fourth innings of the match, messrs Petit and Chevalier had chalked up 57-0, the latter having overturned an LBW decision in the first over. Five sessions remained, 516 runs were required.

As is so often the case, the resumption prompted a wicket. Chevalier, having shown such discipline, played an unnecessary pull shot off Bumrah and was caught behind by Pant. Having batted for in excess of an hour, departing for just 21 was a waste. To the very next delivery Petit (36) was bowled by Jadeja’s first and our solid foundations suddenly didn’t seem so solid!

Smith (11) seemed to be defending resolutely but inside edged off Jadeja into the gloves of Pant. 58-0 had become 77-3. After some boundaries from Pitko, Rizvi defended a delivery from Jadeja only to see the ball bounce up off his boot and be caught at short leg. The wheels had come off and we were 86-4. Zidane Thomas, yet to make double figures in the series, arrived at the crease. 15 balls later, he hadn’t even made single figures and was bowled by Ashwin for a duck! 110-5!

First innings hero Iceman Pitko fell Rizvi style, defending a Jadeja delivery only to see the ball ricochet off his footwear and be snapped up a short leg. Like Rizvi, Pitko (43) will wish he’d just smacked the ball for 6 rather than defend. Le Tallec, who had tactically performed well at times, couldn’t lead by example with the bat. The captain nicked a needless cut shot to Pant off the rampant Jadeja (5-56) having made only 10. Gloveman Marwan Leroy, who had performed well behind the stumps, dug deep to do the same in front of them. He and Louis Petit reached tea on day four with the score 174-7, just 399 required for victory.

Leroy and Petit batted on sensibly and the former passed fifty for the first time at Test level. With the partnership blossoming at 77 and the crowd getting behind them, Leroy (61) nicked behind off Ashwin (3-24) when defending a shortish delivery. After an excellent display behind the stumps the young wicketkeeper had applied himself admirably and cemented his place as the team’s number one wicketkeeper batsman. Petit (43) soon fell in almost identical fashion. Qadri (6) then top edged a pull of Bumrah (2-88) next ball to gift Pant a sixth catch of the innings. The margin of defeat was a whopping 330 runs but there were still many positives gained as we recorded a 1-1 series draw away from home and in alien conditions against an established test nation. Onto Australia…

Should Cricket be Played Behind Closed Doors? – The Results

Hi all

After a few too many minutes frustration on my new laptop, I’ve managed to get the screenshot function… functioning, well, sort of!

As you can see from the graphic above, the voting has resulted in a 50/50 split. Honestly, there are so many factors to consider that an even share of the voting is understandable. I’d hazard a guess that some people who voted may have been a little 50/50 or at least 60/40 themselves. Everything from crowds, TV, revenue, keeping people at all levels in jobs and providing entertainment to people who’ve been starved of such, are things that need taking into consideration. To be honest, I can’t even remember which way I voted myself. Yes that’s right, I vote on my own polls!

Cricket is of course a non-contact sport though players can get close at times. They’re also chucking a ball (Hard surface) to each other. Could that potentially spread the virus? Players constantly need treatment (Physical contact) for aches and pains and most definetly require medical professionals on site and potential ambulance attendance for some of the rare but horrific injuries we’ve seen.

We should find out in the upcoming months if cricket is played behind closed doors or not.

Many thanks for voting and stay safe!

Double (Or Triple?) Trouble!

There’s a suggestion that if any international cricket is played in the near future that England could field multiple teams in order to play different formats on the same day.

Now whether or not that would be a crossover between red and white ball cricket or that ODI and T20I could clash obviously remains unclear. Let’s assume that each and every format was being played on the same day. Who makes which team? Oh, and for ease we’ll select for matches played in England… at the risk of being rather optimistic!

Test

Rory Burns

Dominic Sibley

Zak Crawley

Joe Root (Captain)

Ollie Pope

Sam Curran

Ben Foakes (Wicketkeeper)

Mark Wood

Jack Leach

Stuart Broad

James Anderson

Sam Northeast

Jamie Porter

ODI

Dawid Malan (Captain)

Tom Banton

James Vince

Sam Hain

Dan Lawrence

Sam Billings (Wicketkeeper)

Craig Overton

Lewis Gregory

Oly Stone

Saqib Mahmood

Matt Parkinson

Liam Livingstone

David Willey

Dom Bess

T20I (Which I’ve prioritised over ODI due to the impending World Cup)

Jason Roy

Jos Buttler (Wicketkeeper)

Jonny Bairstow

Eoin Morgan (Captain)

Ben Stokes

Moeen Ali

Tom Curran

Chris Jordan

Chris Woakes

Jofra Archer

Adil Rashid

Phil Salt

Joe Denly

Pat Brown

What are your thoughts on my selections? What would you do differently?

Wales Granted International Status by ICC!

After years of knocking down the door, Welsh cricket has finally been granted independent international status by the ICC. No longer will the country be merely a feeder club for the England team.

Cardiff born captain Geraint Williams-Hughes couldn’t hold back the emotion, “It’s what we’ve all dreamed off, from Cardiff to the valleys, from Swansea to the top of Mount Snowdon. The dream has finally come true”, said the 27-year-old tear-drenched truck driver.

Newly-wed Bristol born teenage wicketkeeper Owen Jones, who qualifies through his wife’s grandma’s adopted cousin, was equally looking forward to playing full international cricket, “The ability is here in the camp. We’re literally flooding with talent. I’m looking forward to touring. I’ve never left the confines of Gloucestershire before but my wife has taught me some Welsh and she’s got family in Sydney so I hope to make the squad for Australia. I’ve asked our vice-captain Evan Evans (A qualified accountant) to counter-sign my passport application. I can’t wait!”.

Puffin Island born batsman Peter Zeta-Jones will be trying to dodge ducks not puffins when Wales grace the international stage. It’ll be on the shoulders of him and the likes of Wrexham wrist-spinner Llewelyn Cadwallader and express left-arm coal-miner Dylan Morgan-Davies to make The Dragons fly!

Wales will play there first full internationals in a T20I triangular tournament with the two other new nations to be formally recognised by the ICC today, Kangaroo Island and South East Quebec.

Good luck to them!

Cricket Player Anagrams

Hi all

I hope that the following anagrams can briefly entertain you. They are all the names of international crickets and I’ve very kindly provided the country that they represented…

NIARB ARAL (West Indies)

LADDNO RANDAMB (Australia)

RAILTAAS KOCU (England)

RAFGLEDI OBRESS (West Indies)

HACNIS RUNDEKTAL (India)

RYEHN GOONAL (Zimbabwe)

KARM DOWO (England)

NAJYAS GRANBA (India)

TIMRAN LIPTUGI (New Zealand)

HASHDI DIRFIA (Pakistan)

Did you manage to claim all ten wickets?