2018 Women’s World T20

In just under a week’s time on November 9th, the 2018 Women’s World T20 takes place in West Indies, the land of the defending champions.

Click on the link below for full details…

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_ICC_Women%27s_World_Twenty20

The hosts will hope to defend the title in their own backyard via performances from players such as Cheandra Nation and the destructive Deandra Dottin. Current World ODI Champions England will also be confident however. Their squad includes inventive players such as Nat Sciver and Danielle Wyatt while Amy Jones (Pictured above) will wear the ‘keeping gloves in the absence of Sarah Taylor.

In captain Meg Lanning, Australia have the women’s game’s best player but in truth, T20 isn’t her strongest suit. Ashleigh Gardner could be key in this format. Neighbours New Zealand have talented individuals such as run-machine Amy Satterthwaite and spin sensation Amelia Kerr to keep them competitive.

India, with players such as Mithali Raj and Smriti Mandhana, will have high hopes for the tournament, though their neighbours, an out of form Pakistan, seem less likely contenders. They’ll rely heavily on the exploits of Diana Baig.

South Africa have some high quality cricketers, Laura Wolvaardt and Sune Luus amongst them but will need to discover consistency if they’re to challenge for this year’s crown. Chamari Atapattu will lead Sri Lanka’s charge.

It’ll be interesting to see how competitive the likes of Bangladesh and Ireland can be. Both teams had to make it through the qualifier to get this far. For Bangladesh, keep an eye out for eighteen-year-old spinner Nahida Akter. For Ireland, who took an almighty battering at the hands of New Zealand in ODIs not all that long ago, look out for talented all-round sportswoman Mary Waldron. Not content with representing her nation at cricket, she’s played football at international level as well as playing hockey to a high standard.

Here’s hoping for a great tournament to further develop and promote the women’s game.

InKerredible!

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New Zealand’s teenage prodigy Amelia Kerr has today smashed the record for the highest individual score in Women’s ODI cricket. She also took a five-wicket haul just for good measure too.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/18508/game/1145893/ireland-women-vs-new-zealand-women-3rd-odi-new-zealand-women-tour-of-ireland-and-england-2018/

Once again the experienced tourists have anhialated their Irish hosts, a side that has amongst it a number of teenagers, including a fifteen-year-old opening bowler who now averages 341.00 with the ball in ODI Cricket. This leads to some serious questions regarding the validity of the records, the futures of Ireland’s teenage bowlers and how they handle such drubbings as well as how much New Zealand actually gain from these matches.

Are such encounters like those in Dublin today, really good preparation for playing stronger opposition?

A counter argument of course, particularly in today’s match will be that Kerr herself is only seventeen-years-old. New Zealand shuffled their batting order in a way that some might describe as disrespectful. New Zealand clearly saw it as an opportunity to present responsibility to players and provide potentially confidence boosting chances to members of their squad. It’s understandable that New Zealand felt the regular top order had little more to gain and that this was a good opportunity to challenge lower order batsmen who hold ambitions of batting higher up the order on a regular basis. They’d earned the right to do this.

Fingers crossed that the likes of Louisa Little, Lara Maritz and Cara Murray can learn from their brutal initiation to international cricket and blossom in the seasons to come.

Extras

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Bye: I can’t keep my eyes off the Kookaburra Ghost. Marcus Harris used it to good effect in compiling 120 for Victoria in the first innings of the 2016/17 Sheffield Shield final…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/1036431.html

If somebody came up to me and provided me with around £90.00 and said “Go and spend it on a cricket bat” then the Kookaburra Ghost is what I’d spend ‘my hard earned‘ cash on!

Leg Bye: Just like the CC/ODC competition, Telegraph’s T20 fantasy cricket will set you back £8.00 per team or £15.00 for three teams. At least the overall winner receives a whopping… £1,000 prize!

https://fantasycricket.telegraph.co.uk/twenty/select-team

Shrewd selectors will notice that Worcestershire opening batsman and part-time spin bowler Brett D’Oliveira (Listed as an all-rounder in the CC/ODC comp) is listed as a bowler. Get him in your team! Meanwhile, Essex’s Tom Westley’s seven career wickets in 54 T20 outings get him listed as an all rounder! There are a few players with generously low ratings based on their efforts in last year’s comp/career T20 records. Obviously the Telegraph can’t rate people on potential but players such as Liam Livingstone (5), Paul Collingwood (3) and Mason Crane (1) are the surely the sort of candidates to sneak into your XI… if you can afford it/if you can afford it (If you know what I mean?)!

No Ball: The Women’s World Cup is on the horizon. Just like the Champions Trophy, there are no matches taking place anywhere near my abode. Come on the White Knights! (England’s flag is white and the team are captained by Heather Knight!?).

Surely the best cricket player that Japan has ever produced, errr, England’s Natalie Sciver…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/england/content/player/515905.html

is Silly Point’s player to look out for during the tournament, as well as New Zealand’s Amelia Kerr…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/white-ferns-call-on-kerr-to-curb-run-flow/

Wide: 14.74, 14.35, 13.25, 14.74 and 15.00. Afghanistan’s 18-year-old leg-spinner Rashid Khan’s bowling averages in each form of the game!!!

http://www.espncricinfo.com/afghanistan/content/player/793463.html

White Ferns Call on Kerr to Curb Run Flow

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New Zealand Women have selected teenage spin bowler Amelia Kerr in their World Cup squad for the tournament that commences next month in England. The Wellington Wizard was just fourteen years of age when she popped up on YouTube, the great hope for New Zealand Women’s cricket. Of course courting such attention at that age can have a detrimental effect (Freddy Adu anybody?). Kerr though has clocked up ten wickets in 7 ODIs to date, at an average of just 22.90. The Wellington native has already claimed two four-wicket hauls in those 7 appearances and gone at less than four runs per over, 3.89 to be precise.

There’s something utterly bizarre about looking at a person’s Cricinfo profile page and seeing a birthday in the 2000s!

http://www.espncricinfo.com/newzealand/content/player/803971.html

Here’s a Trans World Sport feature on the leg-spinner who can bat too. She struck 119 for Wellington Women against Otago Women as recently as February.

Cricket runs in the Kerr family. Amelia’s sister plays alongside her at domestic level, both parents played the game and grandfather Bruce Murray clocked up 13 Test caps for the Black Caps. Murray’s career best 90 came in Lahore when New Zealand beat Pakistan for the first time.

http://www.howstat.com/cricket/Statistics/Matches/MatchScorecard.asp?MatchCode=0663

That was nearly half a century ago. Kerr will hope to create some historic moments of her own in the sport in the years and even decades to come.

Disclaimer: Irrelevant lyrics, relevant title!