Following On

I thought that I’d provide a little insight into how I acquire a following on my blog…

I’ve written nearly 600 posts now and have a pitiful (No disrespect!) 120 or so followers. My fatal two-year tagging error cost me dearly but I’m writing wrongs this year. My subscriptions go something like this.

580 cricket articles: 85 followers (Including forced family as well as those marketing and utter nonsense followers you get!)

10 book reviews: 15 followers

10 poems: 15 followers

1 blogging tip article: 5 followers

Now those poems and book reviews are cricket themed of course but it’s a little disproportionate for my efforts. Maybe I should stop writing about cricket altogether and just write poetry and book reviews!

A man in a field/car park holding a jug

For no reason at all, here’s a picture of me (Excuse the tint, we’ve all been through that phase!) winning a cricket trophy. I didn’t bat, bowl or take a catch in the final. I didn’t even stop the ball but did pick it up twice. Still, better than my previous efforts in a final… run out having been sent back (Quite rightly) first ball!

Shehan Karunatilaka: Chinaman Book Review

Errr…. ?

So I’ve finished reading this book and don’t quite know what to make of it but fortunately not in the same way as that ‘cricket‘ book that Barack Obama was reading!

It’s absurdly fictitious (I think!) but based on reality (Well, sort of).

I don’t read much fiction at all but being cricket literature written in the first person, Karunatilaka’s Chinaman is not that far removed from my usual readings.

I was starting to find it a little drawn out during the fourth day’s play but a change of innings on the final day re-awoke my interest.

Some people might scorn at one or two slightly fanciful things that appear on various pages and many of the character names are a little too ‘combine two genuine Sri Lankan cricketers’, see Marvan Arnold but the book is still original. Chinaman manages to stay on track despite heading off in different directions. Go figure!

I enjoy writing but am utterly hopeless at reviewing things (Can you tell?). At least I made it to the end unlike that 700-page sci-fi work about living on Mars. Next up I have Barry Richards’ autobiography but might be squeezing in some non-cricket books beforehand.

Back to Chinaman, Shehan Karunatilaka’s effort reaches the close of play undefeated on…

78 not out

Cricket Films Worth Watching

Following on (See what I did there?) from my recent post titled ‘Cricket Books Worth Reading’…

https://sillypointcricket.com/2018/11/28/cricket-books-worth-reading/

Here are some cricket films that are well worth watching. As was the case with books, it’s pretty much all non-fiction (Documentaries). Oh, and actually some of them are books as well…

Death of a Gentleman

For cynics of cricket’s top brass, feast on this!

Fire in Babylon

Focusing on West Indian success throughout the 1970s and 80s.

Out of the Ashes

This film charts the rapid rise of the Afghanistan men’s team… including the unceremonious ditching of their coach!

Warriors

I bet that you never thought you’d watch a film about cricket and female genital mutilation did you?

Here’s the link to my original write-up…

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/01/19/warriors-dvd-review/

Howzat: Kerry Packer’s War

This is actually a two-part television drama and the book that it’s based on featured in my ‘… Worth Reading’ list…

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/06/29/christopher-lee-howzat-book-review/

In terms of fiction, there are films such as P’tang Yang Kipperbang and Wondrous Oblivion to Watch.

Lookout for my review of Sachin: A Billion Dreams soon. Because somebody’s getting it for Christmas!!!

Cricket Books Worth Reading

Hi followers

Here’s are some cricket books that I’ve read that I’d thoroughly recommend you do too.Ā Some books I read before I started this blog but where I’ve already reviewed a book, I’ve provided the link.

Ed Smith Playing Hardball

There’s a great line in this book that explains the fundamental difference between baseball and cricket. It’s one that’s really good to have a handle on to understand the one of the two you’re less familiar with.

Tim Lane and Elliot Cartledge Chasing Shadows: The Life and Death of Peter Roebuck

A book bound to stir discomfort amongst some, this seems a fairly written effort of a delicate subject, a delicate life. I can’t claim to have been overly familiar with Roebuck before reading this book recently. Of course I knew the name but as I wrote in my review… I judged the book and not the man.

https://sillypointcricket.com/2018/09/22/elliot-cartledge-and-tim-lane-chasing-shadows-the-life-and-death-of-peter-roebuck-book-review/

Christopher Lee Howzat

An insight into Kerry Packer and how he changed the face of cricket. It’s all very apt given the so many changes occurring on the global cricket horizon right now and in the not too distant past. Traditionalists may despise him but cricket would look a lot different if it weren’t for Packer or certainly wouldn’t have progressed at the same rate.

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/06/29/christopher-lee-howzat-book-review/

Peter Obourne Wounded Tiger: A History of Cricket in Pakistan

What’s great about this book is that you don’t just learn about the history of cricket in Pakistan but about the history of Pakistan in general. Not surprisingly, it’s an exhaustive read but one that makes me long to discover written histories of other cricket nations.

The following three books are essential reading for fans like me who long for the game to blossom outside of the Test circuit.

Tim Brooks Cricket on the Continent

https://sillypointcricket.com/2016/11/20/tim-brooks-cricket-on-the-continent-book-review/

Tim Wigmore and Peter Miller Second XI: Cricket in its Outposts

Roy Morgan Real International Cricket: A History in One Hundred Scorecards

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/03/03/roy-morgan-real-international-cricket-book-review/

There are others, some that I’ve enjoyed, others that I haven’t. You can find all my book reviews here…

https://sillypointcricket.com/category/book-reviews/

I’ve currently got a stash of more bat ‘n’ ball themed books waiting to be read so look out for more reviews in 2019!

Simon Hughes: Who Wants to be a Batsman? Book Review

I’ll be honest, I’ve never been a huge fan of Simon Hughes and this book has done nothing to alter that. The writing is a little too self-indulgent for my liking. In Hughes’ defence, it’s obviously understandable that he should be inking based on his own experiences.

Hughes is clearly obsessed with Mark Ramprakash and of course he’s not alone in being so. The author also seems particularly keen to raise the profile of his daughter, a very talented cricketer according to Hughes’ unbiased opinion!

In amongst the drivel are a couple of really insightful passages, which in a perverse way are what make this book disappointing. By that I mean you must plough through a chapter or two to find interesting content. I’m possibly being a little harsh but Hughes’ onscreen persona has never endeared himself to me. He joins the long list of analysers who confirm that to have played the game doesn’t automatically make you an insightful pundit!

That said, I’ll repeat that there are one or two profound insights amongst the pages and all this adds up to a Silly Point score of…

Stumped on 59!