Cricket Films Worth Watching

Following on (See what I did there?) from my recent post titled ‘Cricket Books Worth Reading’…

https://sillypointcricket.com/2018/11/28/cricket-books-worth-reading/

Here are some cricket films that are well worth watching. As was the case with books, it’s pretty much all non-fiction (Documentaries). Oh, and actually some of them are books as well…

Death of a Gentleman

For cynics of cricket’s top brass, feast on this!

Fire in Babylon

Focusing on West Indian success throughout the 1970s and 80s.

Out of the Ashes

This film charts the rapid rise of the Afghanistan men’s team… including the unceremonious ditching of their coach!

Warriors

I bet that you never thought you’d watch a film about cricket and female genital mutilation did you?

Here’s the link to my original write-up…

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/01/19/warriors-dvd-review/

Howzat: Kerry Packer’s War

This is actually a two-part television drama and the book that it’s based on featured in my ‘… Worth Reading’ list…

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/06/29/christopher-lee-howzat-book-review/

In terms of fiction, there are films such as P’tang Yang Kipperbang and Wondrous Oblivion to Watch.

Lookout for my review of Sachin: A Billion Dreams soon. Because somebody’s getting it for Christmas!!!

Cricket Books Worth Reading

Hi followers

Here’s are some cricket books that I’ve read that I’d thoroughly recommend you do too. Some books I read before I started this blog but where I’ve already reviewed a book, I’ve provided the link.

Ed Smith Playing Hardball

There’s a great line in this book that explains the fundamental difference between baseball and cricket. It’s one that’s really good to have a handle on to understand the one of the two you’re less familiar with.

Tim Lane and Elliot Cartledge Chasing Shadows: The Life and Death of Peter Roebuck

A book bound to stir discomfort amongst some, this seems a fairly written effort of a delicate subject, a delicate life. I can’t claim to have been overly familiar with Roebuck before reading this book recently. Of course I knew the name but as I wrote in my review… I judged the book and not the man.

https://sillypointcricket.com/2018/09/22/elliot-cartledge-and-tim-lane-chasing-shadows-the-life-and-death-of-peter-roebuck-book-review/

Christopher Lee Howzat

An insight into Kerry Packer and how he changed the face of cricket. It’s all very apt given the so many changes occurring on the global cricket horizon right now and in the not too distant past. Traditionalists may despise him but cricket would look a lot different if it weren’t for Packer or certainly wouldn’t have progressed at the same rate.

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/06/29/christopher-lee-howzat-book-review/

Peter Obourne Wounded Tiger: A History of Cricket in Pakistan

What’s great about this book is that you don’t just learn about the history of cricket in Pakistan but about the history of Pakistan in general. Not surprisingly, it’s an exhaustive read but one that makes me long to discover written histories of other cricket nations.

The following three books are essential reading for fans like me who long for the game to blossom outside of the Test circuit.

Tim Brooks Cricket on the Continent

https://sillypointcricket.com/2016/11/20/tim-brooks-cricket-on-the-continent-book-review/

Tim Wigmore and Peter Miller Second XI: Cricket in its Outposts

Roy Morgan Real International Cricket: A History in One Hundred Scorecards

https://sillypointcricket.com/2017/03/03/roy-morgan-real-international-cricket-book-review/

There are others, some that I’ve enjoyed, others that I haven’t. You can find all my book reviews here…

https://sillypointcricket.com/category/book-reviews/

I’ve currently got a stash of more bat ‘n’ ball themed books waiting to be read so look out for more reviews in 2019!

Christopher Lee: Howzat Book Review

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It happens to be a rather appropriate time to be reviewing Christopher Lee’s take on World Series Cricket (Supertests and all), what with the addition to the cricket calendar of pink ball day/night County Championship matches that were rolled out for the first time this week.

Lee actually wrote the screenplay for the TV drama of this book with the writing of the book coming post TV production. It’s an insightful read with a clear Ozzie vibe. The focus is on WSC’s chief instigator Kerry Packer, his challenging of the establishment and the changes that WSC cricket brought. It’s not all about Packer though. John Cornell, described by Gideon Haigh as ‘a floating creative catalyst’ is among the others that ultimately changed the way we see cricket today, literally given what they did regards camerawork. The establishment boys didn’t like the changes. Some still don’t. Reading about the pink ball county matches this week I came across one journalist trying to convince the reader that it’s not the weather that’s been at fault but that there’s simply no hunger for late night pink ball affairs. Actually there is. Even if the crowds were no better than usual, if the attendees were different people to the norm then that’s great. Cricket is for all. If some fans can attend day games and some night games then let’s have both. Just because something is new and different doesn’t mean that people need be scared by… CHANGE! Let’s not forget that a lot of people won’t have known about the different schedule for this week’s matches but them actually happening will have caught some people’s attention. Obviously it’s still four-day (First Class) cricket so unlike one-day (List A) games or T20 matches, fans won’t necessarily get a result but let’s not throw the idea in the bin yet. Let’s welcome pink ball day/night games to the County Championship next year with open arms.

Forgive me, I digress but the parallels with cricket today (day/night matches, T20 leagues, international restructure, ‘The Big Three’, TV rights etc) with what was occurring in the 1970s are clear for everybody to see.

Crocodile Dundee even gets a few mentions in Lee’s literature and having seen the Howzat TV drama sometime ago, before I was as obsessed with the sport of bat ‘n’ ball as I am now, I’m keen to view it again. From what I can recall the book very precisely follows the same path as the TV production.

Christopher Lee’s Howzat is essential reading for any cricket geek and now is an acutely appropriate time to read it.

Lee’s Howzat finishes undefeated on…

91 not out