Kevin Pietersen: On Cricket Book Review

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Strictly speaking this isn’t an autobiography. KP delves into the technical aspects of taking on the various types of bowling that there is out there, as well as writing about such things as captaincy and the future of the game. That’s not to say that there aren’t autobiographical elements to it, which let’s be fair, would be hard to avoid.

As a highly unsuccessful village cricketer, it’s amazing to read about how a pro reads the ball out of the hand. I can barely see the ball at all in the north England evening light, let alone identify which side is shiny or which finger is rolling over the seam!

Pietersen is adamant that international cricketers shouldn’t be overcooked but is at pains to point out that being a cricketer is a great job and he realises he and his peers aren’t down a coal mine every day.

His thoughts on the future structure of international cricket seem a little half-cooked and as per usual with any book, there are one or two errors amongst the 277 pages that you do wonder how they ever get to print. KP tells us that at Edgbaston in the 2005 Ashes, England claimed the wicket of Brett Lee to level the series. No you didn’t KP. He also tells us that he wasn’t selected for an ODI series in 2000. Too right KP. You didn’t debut with England until 2004!

All in all it was an interesting and easy to read… read.

Silly Point provides Kevin Pietersen: On Cricket with a score of…

79 not out