Statistical Quirks Discovered Whilst Trawling Cricinfo Player Profile Pages Over the Years

img_2140-2

Nathan Hauritz

Australian twirler Nathan Hauritz finished his career with 63 Test wickets and a matching tally in ODIs.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/5593.html

Does anybody have a higher matching pair?

Michael Carberry

Former England opening bat Michael Carberry’s career best batting stats are as follows:

First Class: 300 not out

List A: 150 not out

T20: 100 not out

http://www.espncricinfo.com/england/content/player/10656.html

Neat, very neat!

Paul Harris

South African spinner Paul Harris’ Test career began and ended as follows…

Test debut: South Africa vs. India, Cape Town, January 2nd-6th 2007

Last Test: South Africa vs. India, Cape Town, January 2nd-6th 2011

http://www.espncricinfo.com/southafrica/content/player/45568.html

Symmetry!

Napoleon Einstein

Not so much a statistical quirk but his name alone merits a mention.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/india/content/player/279540.html

To be fair, in regards to his statistics, he did score 92 on List A debut but only ever played one more List A match and one T20.

Greg Loveridge

New Zealand leg-spinner Greg Loveridge holds a place in the hearts of many cricket tragics the world over. On Test debut against Zimbabwe in Hamilton, he retired hurt on four not out, didn’t bowl and never played again.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/newzealand/content/player/37609.html

A First Class bowling average of 53.23 didn’t exactly scream “Recall!”.

Mohammad Sami

There are players with worse Test bowling averages than Pakistan’s Mohammad Sami…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/pakistan/content/player/41324.html

But to win 36 caps with a bowling average of 52.74 is mightily impressive!

Disclaimer: There’s probably some far more interesting stats that I’ve previously stumbled upon only to forget about and admittedly there’s some recycled material in here!

Andrew Strauss

IMG_3495

I’m a little late to the crease here because not surprisingly the first headlines that I read stated nothing more than family reasons. However it turns out that England Director of Cricket Andrew Strauss has left England’s Ashes tour to be with his wife who has been diagnosed with cancer. There’s no need for an in-depth article here, just some crossed fingers for the family of a man who has been an integral part of English cricket this century.

Matthew Wade, Yuvraj Singh, Michael Carberry and Tom Fell are amongst current cricketers who have managed to battle back from cancer. Let’s hope that Mrs Strauss can do the same.

Edit: It’s since come to my attention that one of my favourite players, Australian Michael Klinger, is also absent from cricket for the very same reason as Andrew Strauss. Fingers firmly crossed for the Klinger family as well.

Malan’s the Man!

Not content with notching up Test hundreds in computer games, Dawid Malan’s only gone and got one in real life!

Although fellow England newbie Mark Stoneman hasn’t registered a century yet and is developing a penchant for contributing both classy and at the same time gritty fifty-somethings, I sincerely hope that England stick with these guys post Ashes and don’t just move onto their next new toy like they did after Michael Carberry. These thirty-somethings have developed their game on the county circuit and having been presented with the obvious fact that Test cricket is a step up, they’re raising their game and learning to adapt. Come home series against subcontinental sides, you’d like to think that ‘Rocky’ and ‘AC’ will now feel at home in the England shirt and can prosper. As for James Vince…

It’s not just against India or Pakistan at home that you’d like to think Stoneman and Malan could deliver. Having displayed their skills and character in ‘The Land of Oz‘, they’ve shown they might posses the required nous to adapt against all sides, home and away. Of course touring places like Bangladesh is like playing on another planet.

Mike Hussey didn’t arrive on the Test scene until he was aged thirty, Andy Flower blossomed around thirty-two and the likes of Kumar Sangakarra and Misbah-ul-Haq peaked much later. Here’s hoping and believing that Stoneman and Malan follow suit and inspire those players who aren’t bred through the normal modern development channels. As for James Vince…

On a serious note, hopefully Vince can be inspired by the the efforts of Stoneman and Malan. If the Hampshire man can adapt where necessary but trust his own game where appropriate, he could register the sort of scores that win matches and earn long careers.

Don Bradman Cricket 17: Best Of!

IMG_3478

In anticipation of the release of Big Ant’s latest cricket game titled Ashes Cricket, slated to hit PS4s and XboX Ones come November 16th, I thought we’d celebrate by looking back at some of the highlights from Don Bradman Cricket 17. There were some classic matches featuring England against a variety of opposition from all corners of the globe. Some matches ended with victory for England, some ended with defeat… and some neither!

A Lyth Less Ordinary!

IMG_2924

Yorkshire’s Adam Lyth wrote his name in the history books as England totalled in excess of 300 when chasing against Nepal in a One-Day-International but was it enough…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/03/09/a-lyth-less-ordinary/

Trumped!

IMG_3079

Cancer survivor Michael Carberry returned to England colours for a T20I against USA…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/04/16/don-bradman-cricket-17-england-v-usa-t20i-trumped/

Greece Frightening!

IMG_3295

Haseeb Hameed batted slickly against Greece but could his teammates back him up in Corfu…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/don-bradman-cricket-17-greece-frightening/

Thai’d in Knots!

IMG_3439

Hameed continued his fine form against Thailand at London’s Olympic Stadium in ‘The Test of the Century so Far’…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/06/24/don-bradman-cricket-17-thaid-in-knots/

Paper, Scissors, Stoneman!

IMG_3477

On his international debut in Liverpool, Mark Stoneman batted like Mark Stoneman as England’s ODI against Vanuatu went to the wire…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/06/28/don-bradman-cricket-17-paper-scissors-stoneman/

Oh and this guy scored a couple of First Class centuries…

IMG_3311

Does England’s Ashes Squad Really Matter?

IMG_3295

Hameed or Stoneman?

Jennings or Westley?

Hameed and Stoneman?

Malan or/and Ballance?

Does it really matter?

England Lions (Or A Team if you’d rather be old-fashioned about it) will, like England’s senior side, be in Australia this winter. The last thing England want is another Boyd Rankin episode, i.e. get to the fifth Test and pick a player who isn’t prepped to play. I appreciate that Australia’s a big country and England need cover for any last minute dramas (Glenn McGrath step on the ball style) and fielding substitutes but once a Test is under way then it would seem logical to rotate the non-playing squad members with Lions players. This way the first team reserves can keep their eye in and/or clock up some overs incase they’re required for a Test outing. If by any chance the Lions players supersede first Team squad members then so be it. England need to make the most of what resources they have and be ruthless when it comes to selection. This philosophy may seem rather un-me like provided my penchant for a ‘pick and stick’ approach but this is a tough long tour and England need to select the players that are primed and ready to perform. Australia are renowned for providing pretty limp opposition for a touring England side but Test playing nations are obliged to present touring A (Or Lions) teams with reasonable opposition, otherwise there’d be little point. Come the later Tests in the series, England can’t expect players that have been ferrying the drinks and netting for a month to just rock up and produce the goods in the hostile auditoriums of Australia.

So whether Hameed or Westley make the full team or Malan or Jennings make the Lions, any of them could turn out for England come the Ashes. A broken finger in the nets or calf strain when scampering a single in a warm-up game could force England into a change of plans. Don’t forget what happened the last time England went to Australia when opening batsman Michael Carberry was selected as back-up. He scored 150 in a tour game and went onto play five Ashes Tests.