Mankad? – Mancan!

No introduction needed…

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Take care followers.

Edit: I neglected to say that I have no qualms about it being a pre-determined tactic either. Just like teams prepare to ball short stuff to a batsman with a dodgy track record against short pitched bowling then well done if they’ve done their homework and identified a batsman susceptible to being ‘Mankaded’.

You can Only Take ten Catches!

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I’ve previously written about naivety in sport and during the excellent commentary on Ireland’s inaugural Test match against Pakistan provided by Guerilla Cricket, there was, I’m sorry to say, a classic example of the sort of thing that really irks me!

The commentators were discussing the amount of dropped catches off the bowling of the likes of Mohammad Amir, Stuart Broad and Ravi Ashwin. They explained how because Amir had had say twenty-six catches dropped off his bowling, that he would have twenty-six more wickets to his name had those chances been held… but he wouldn’t! You can only take ten wickets in a match. Had some of those catches been claimed then some of the other chances that were dropped and even wickets that were taken would not have existed. If a team claims ten wickets in an innings then you can’t add another five dropped catches to a player’s potential wicket tally. Three dropped catches might have gone to ground when the opposition were nine wickets down. If for example, the very first drop had been taken then the whole sequence after would be different. Maybe a left-hander not a right-hander would have been on strike to the next ball, maybe the bowler wouldn’t have taken another wicket, been dropped from the team and never played again.

I’ll revert to the classic example of a football commentator saying that a team have missed three great chances in the first half, that they would be 3-0 up but the score is 0-0. If the first chance had been taken then the next passage of play would’ve been a kick-off not a goal-kick or continuation of open play, therefore the whole sequence there after changes. Yes the team might have created more chances and been 3-0 up but the opposition might have scored straight from kick off, the opposition might lead 4-2 at half-time.

As in any walk of life, even the slightest adjustment to events can result in a completely different chain of events and outcome. I’m going to stop short of providing countless examples but I guess that I don’t believe in fate or destiny, just the consequence of events or the ability to manipulate the future… or of course, maybe that is the fate or destiny?

Disclaimer: Sorry, this is supposed to be a cricket blog and I went down a rather profound path there!

International Duck Watch!

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Tests

Wahab Riaz (Pakistan)

Riaz was dismissed LBW fifth ball to New Zealand’s Colin de Grandhomme (1-29) in the second Test in Hamilton. Soon after, commencing their second innings with a lead of 55 New Zealand’s openers Jeet Raval faced one delivery without scoring and Tom Latham (Golden duck in the first innings) is yet to face!

Usman Khawaja (Australia)

How do you follow a first innings 145?

Drop down the order and fall LBW second ball to become Tabraiz Shamsi’s (1-49) second Test wicket however Australia (Warner 47, Smith 40, Renshaw 34 not out) won by seven wickets. South Africa though win the series 2-1.

Ajinkya Rahane (India)

LBW sixth ball to England’s in-form Adil Rashid (3-81) as England fought back before India fought back in the third Test in Mohali. India (Kohli 62, Ashwin 57 not out) trail by twelve runs with four wickets remaining.

ODIs

Brian Vitori (Zimbabwe)

Zimbabwe number eleven Vitori fell second ball to Sri Lanka’s Asela Gunaratne in the Tri-Series final. Vitori then dismissed Dhananjaya De Sliva with the very first delivery of Sri Lanka’s reply. Vitori finished with figures of 3-52 as Sri Lanka (Kusal Mendis 57) won the final by six wickets. Earlier on debut, Zimbabwe’s Tarisai Musakanda top scored for his side with 36 from 37 deliveries. Just making his debut in a final, as you do!