Telegraph Fantasy Cricket: CC/ODC – Post ODC Update

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Hi followers

The graphic above displays my standings now that the group stage of the One-Day Cup has reached its conclusion. International call-ups, injuries and squad rotation have all played their part in scuppering my best laid plans. I’ve been reasonably aggressive with captaincy changes and have tinkered with transfers to get as many players on terra firma as possible. I’ve kept half my captaincy changes for the rest of the County Championship and for the most part have two thirds plus of my transfer allocation left. Now it’s about making sure that my XIs consist of long-term certain starters and saving transfers for the occasional uncontrollable. I do have to bear in mind players such as Marnus Labuschagne who won’t be around for the duration of the summer. Some players have arrived especially for the second phase of the County Championship (Bavuma/Rahane) or have returned from the IPL (Curran.S/Livingstone).

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Livingstone is a batsman who bowls and a good catcher. Curran is listed as a bowler not an all-rounder and with him not being in England’s World Cup squad, both are worth consideration.

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Leading points scorers

Across my teams my star performers have been Hampshire’s Liam Dawson (1027 pts), Sussex’s David Wiese (805) and Kent’s Matt Milnes (748).

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Dawson is now the third most selected player and Milnes is now in 17% of people’s teams but I’ve had him in from the beginning when he was in few people’s XIs so I was gaining points that few TFC participants were. The aforementioned Labuschagne (Listed as a batsman) hasn’t always fired with the bat but has regularly chipped in with the white orb. That’s the advantage of selecting a batsman who bowls because even if they fail with the bat (Remember a duck scores -20) they can still break even or contribute positively with the ball.  Yorkshire’s Jonny Tattersall, listed as a batsman but crucially keeping wicket regularly so claiming catches (10pts) and stumpings (15pts) has totalled 538 points. Some people have cottoned on but he’s still in only 5% of teams. Obviously some of my points scored have been doubled when said individual has been made captain, for example: Dawson has always captained for me when playing so has contributed 2054 points for me.

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Most selected players

At the other end of the spectrum, I’ve always advised picking players that have been selected by few participants of the game.

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Having returned from injury, I slotted Essex’s Matt Coles in to one of my teams. He’s been picked by only 0.3% of TFC participants but has gained 280 points for me (Some doubled) from only a few appearances. Dean Elgar (A useful bowling option come CC long summer days) and Mohammad Abbas are a couple of 1%ers that I’ve snuck in recently. Following his temporary relocation up north, Dom Bess is another player that I might transfer in before next week.

My minimum target is for one of my teams to finish in the top 1000 but disappointingly I’ve just slipped out of the top 1k! Hopefully I can get back up there and will keep you posted later this summer!

This Article Would Have a Headline if Anything Appropriate Rhymed With Theunis de Bruyn!

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A duck and a cheap run out were how South Africa’s Theunis de Bruyn began his Test career and in truth it hasn’t got much better since… until now! Having been shunted up and down the order in between being dropped and recalled and with South Africa unable to clarify whether he should be an all-rounder at number six, a specialist batsman at number seven, (Yeah that’s right, Jos Buttler wasn’t the first!) de Bruyn has, over the last two days, suggested he might actually be a Test match number three.

Nothing endears a player to me more that woeful ineptness combined with being mishandled. Just 133 runs in eleven innings meant that I’ve been desperate for de Bruyn to demonstrate his class and oh how he did it in Colombo. He did so as experienced teammates around him floundered however one who didn’t was Temba Bavuma. It’s satisfying to see Bavuma get amongst the runs too as he’s another player that’s South Africa seem to have mucked around. Let’s also not forget spinner Keshav Maharaj’s first innings figures of 9-129. On the opposite side of the coin, it’s great to see Sri Lanka win a Test match (Sorry South Africa!). Sri Lanka have regressed horribly as a competitive outfit and given Zimbabwe’s recent limp efforts, the last thing international cricket requires is a lack of competition.

Burns, Renshaw & Handscomb: 12-3 – Welcome Back Boys!

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Steven Smith, David Warner & Cameron Bancroft. Please come back. All is forgiven. (Say Australian fans!)

For those of you that have been living in a cave for the past week, I feel obliged to inform you that batsmen Steven Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft have all returned home from Australia’s tour of South Africa.

The good news for Australia fans is that Joe Burns & Matt Renshaw have joined the squad whilst Play Station Portable Handscomb has been promoted from 12th man duties. Unfortunately for Australia’s fans, the trio’s combined contribution to their team’s response to the home side’s first innings total of 488 is… 12-3. Renshaw made an epic 8, Burns a fluent half as many and Pistol Pete kept it simple… quack quack. Shaun Marsh is at the crease having failed to reach fifty in the series. He’s made starts but hasn’t backed up his Ashes tons.

There’s still hope for Australia. They’ve got their new captain Tim Paine to come, he of one century in 100 First Class matches (172 innings!). No Seriously, I like Paine and hope that he goes well.

It was great to see Temba Bavuma in the runs for South Africa though he rather unfortunately got left stranded on 95. This was in part due to Morne Morkel’s anti-climatic follow-up to receiving a guard of honour… quack quack first ball! It does seem a bit weird that the home side have mucked Bavuma about. They brought Theunis de Bruyn into the side again but don’t seem to understand what de Bruyn’s role is and have promptly mucked him around again by dropping him again.

Keep tabs on the fourth Test in Johannesburg by clicking on the link below…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/10908/commentary/1075985/south-africa-vs-australia-4th-test-australia-tour-of-south-africa-2018

International Duck Watch!

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In a Test match in Wellington…

… just when you think that you’ve got no work to do, teenage sensation Mehedi Hasan falls to the very last ball of the day, courtesy of some very composed bowling from Neil Wagner!

In a Test match in Johannesburg…

… Temba Bavuma is starting to become a regular in this column and his continued selection will surely only heighten scepticism of South Africa’s selection policy. Rather surprisingly, our loyal club member Suranga Lakmal has so far been unable to get in on the action, leaving the work to Nuwan Pradeep. Pradeep was also responsible for the fall of a runless Vernon Philander who himself was then responsible for the fall of a runless Dimuth Karunaratne

In an ODI in Brisbane…

… Steven Smith, first ball. Mohammad Amir the bowler responsible. Serial Test run struggler Matthew Wade hit a run a ball 100 not out. Following our update on Michael Carberry yesterday, here’s another example of a cancer survivor providing inspiration to many.

Oh and a little extra. Though this column isn’t called International Double-Century Watch, Bangladesh’s Shakib Al Hasan surely merits some recognition for his 217 against New Zealand, ably supported by Mushfiqur Rahim’s 159. Bangladesh seem to be holding it together a bit more in Tests at the moment than they do in the pyjama matches.

A Dark Day for Cricket

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Do I even need to mention the subject?

I can understand Rilee Rossouw’s frustrations. He can’t get in the team because black players (And by black we mean at least two black Africans and four non-whites) such as Temba Bavuma and Jean-Paul Duminy, get selected ahead of him even if (When!) they fail, fail and fail again. This is not to say that Bavuma will not be stronger for his struggles and go on to have an outstanding career or that Duminy hasn’t had his moments. Oh and Rossouw claims this had nothing to do with his relocating but that he “need(s) to buy groceries”!

http://www.cricketcountry.com/news/kyle-abbott-rilee-rossouw-retire-from-international-cricket-sign-kolpak-deal-with-hampshire-564091

For Kyle Abbott the scenario seems somewhat stranger as he is currently in the South African Test XI (Or was) though admittedly full fitness to one or two others might have relegated him to 12th man duties. In recent times Simon Harmer, Stiaan van Zyl and Hardus Viljoen have also joined English counties on Kolpak deals.

Of course we can strip it right back and say that South African national sport teams should be full of black players but by that rational then all black and Asian players need be removed from England teams and Australian national teams would definitely be struggling for players.

Regarding the signatures of Abbott and Rossouw, exactly what message does this send to young cricketers in the county of Hampshire?

For youngsters that aspire to play for their home county, they are now likely to think that their county doesn’t want them and that they’d rather sign experienced South African pros. There will be young English Hampshire players sat in the pavilion or at home when their South African infused team take to the field in 2017.

With the new English domestic season approaching at pace, we are surely headed for another Leicestershire v Northamptonshire episode where most of the players aren’t even eligible to represent England, and on that note…

… I recently wrote an article about the possibility of Darren Bravo playing for England…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/bravo-for-england/

… in truth, the qualification period is now seven years, so this should allay any fears of Abbott and co. gatecrashing the England team anytime soon at least. I previously addressed my understanding of the way that people move around the world these days and how it is not always as straight forward as some people would like to label a person with a nationality but I sincerely hope that the capped South African players arriving in our game this year never don the Three Lions shirt. Luke Ronchi and Ryan Campbell provide recent examples of players that have switched international allegiance post being internationally capped. Imagine if Wayne Rooney retired from international football then moved to the MLS but in five years time became eligible to represent the USA, did so and played against England at the World Cup! If anybody feels that this is xenophobic on my part then so be it. These situations differ dramatically from those of Pietersen, Prior or Trott, or of Robson, Shah and even Joyce but I’ll repeat my comment from my Bravo article that once you’ve made your international bed you must lie in it.

Are you listening Johan Botha?

International Duck Watch!

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In the third Test in Sydney, Babar Azam was the sole duckee as Pakistan commenced their pursuit of Australia’s first innings total of 538-8 declared. The tourists finished the day on 126-2 so still trailing by 412 runs.

In Cape Town, South Africa look destined for a comfortable win against Sri Lanka despite ducks from serial form lackers Hashim Amla and Temba Bavuma. Our good friend Suranga Lakmal was the man responsible for Amla’s dismissal whilst Temba Bavuma committed the perennial Test match sin of being run out.

We’ll be back tomorrow but only if Emilio Estevez can find us some more Mighty Ducks!

Anatomy of Trying to Save a Test Career: Re-Revisited

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Name: Stephen Craig Cook: Mins: 368 Balls: 240 Runs: 104

Stephen Cook scored a hundred on Test debut and now he’s scored one in what many would have suggested could well have been his last Test innings. In-between Cook hasn’t completely disgraced himself (One fifty against NZ) but neither has he set the world alight. His two centuries suggest that he is a player, a man that can dig deepest come the big occasion. His 104 in Adelaide may not have been the most aesthetic and some may argue that he put pressure on his teammates by scoring so slowly but that simply isn’t true. The third Test finished with more than a day to spare, if the likes of Jean-Paul Duminy and Temba Bavuma got out playing rash shots because they felt that their team were getting bogged down then that is their fault, not Cook’s. For now at least Test cricket still lasts five days and whilst many spectators wouldn’t pay to watch Cook but would rather see De Villiers and the like batting in a more aggressive (Attractive?) manner if all players were the same that wouldn’t be very interesting.

There is still a place in Test cricket for players like Stephen Cook.