Nick Compton Retires!

One of England’s more complex characters of recent years has bowed out after failing to make a single first team appearance (First Class/List A/T20) for Middlesex last season. That is not meant as a criticism, more an observation that Nick Compton doesn’t appear like a Graeme Swann type one of the lads or to a lesser extent somebody such as James Anderson but that he comes across as an extremely insular character. It seems more a trait of batsmen but not all (Chris Gayle/David Warner) are reserved or appear as intense as Compton.

Compton seemed to thrive on an old fashioned approach: pitch a tent, occupy the crease as long as possible and pretend that the fate of mankind rested on his shoulders… sprinkled with the odd beautiful boundary. He seemed a player who exhausted so much energy, mental and physical, getting into the England team that, particularly second time around, he then had nothing more to give. Flummoxed by Trevor Bayliss’ comments Compton forgot how to be himself. This resulted in some unnecessary dismissals in South Africa and a limp international ending at home to Sri Lanka. He never recovered and took time away from cricket but good on him for going to Sri Lanka and adapting and performing well on their domestic circuit.

I hope that Compdog writes an autobiography. I anticipate it would be far more insightful and introspective than those of many cricketers.

Cricket Captain 2018

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It’s back folks. Cricket Captain is with us for another year. I’ll be assuming my role as Selector/Coach of the England side and attempting to lead them to glory in the Test, ODI and T20I formats… probably on easy mode!

Why have Ed Smith and Trevor Bayliss take up two roles when yours truly is capable of performing them as one?

We had some great moments on Cricket Captain 2017, notably Mark Stoneman’s 296 against West Indies, David Willey’s 8-14 versus Australia and Adil Rashid’s 166/7-61 in Sri Lanka! What can we achieve on Cricket Captain 2018?

You can of course play many domestic (First Class, List A and T20) leagues in the game as well as creating custom series. Afghanistan and Ireland are fully playable as Test nations in this year’s release.

I’m hoping to be able to record some of my game play on the Mac. I’ll possibly upload that YouTube and put the links here on WordPress.

If you have any questions about the game, maybe you’re thinking about purchasing, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch. I’ll include the link to the forum below…

https://childishthings.com/forum/forum/current-and-future-games/cricket-captain-2018

Selection, Transfers, Drafts and Other Cricket Ramblings

Gareth Southgate selects the England football team… all by himself.

“Football again. I thought this was a cricket blog!”

England cricket coach Trevor Bayliss doesn’t select the team but definitely has an input from time to time. In cricket it’s the norm, certainly in England, for a selection panel to choose the national squad. There’s normally three or four people that spend their days scouting the domestic circuit before getting together to decide if changes to the first XI (Test/ODI & T20I) are necessary and if so, who’s good enough to step up. There’ll normally be one selector who is in position to have the final say. They’ll possibly be referred to as the ‘chairman of’ or ‘chief’ selector(s).

Would such a set-up be beneficial in football?

The main difference between football and cricket, at least in England, is that our national football coach does actually have the time to watch all the domestic players perform. Gareth Southgate can spend a whole weekend watching all of the Premier League matches (Not live obviously) then watch the English teams in Europe during the week. However for the person at the helm of a side such as Australia, where the national side’s players are playing throughout various leagues across the globe, it actually becomes much harder. It’s in these instances where the notion of a selection panel could be worthwhile. On the cricket front, one person would struggle to watch all four days of each of the eighteen English county cricket teams’ County Championship matches, let alone limited overs encounters. That’s even if they were on the telly! Watching selected highlights packages would definitely not be a very good way to go about selecting a national cricket team. This is why a panel of selectors as opposed to just one lone selector is essential in cricket.

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On the subject of the eighteen counties: Only once in a blue moon will Gareth Southgate select a second tier player for the English football team, so should County Championship (First Class) second division players even be considered for England’s Test side?

If they aren’t, we’ll continue to see the Premier League style transfers that are now common place in cricket. Just like in football the supposed better players will join the first division teams but they won’t always play. The second division will get the cast offs, also-rans and not quite good enoughs. At this point it’s worth contemplating what’s more important: The national side or the quality of the product (Sorry, ICC marketing speak!) at domestic level. Loyalty from player to county will also near non-existence and on that subject…

Could county cricket follow the trend of the global T20 leagues and the history of American sport (Including Baseball, Basketball and Ice Hockey) by becoming a drafted league?

Returning to the Premier League but staying on the subject of drafts: Can you imagine the owners of Manchester City, United or Chelsea thinking “Let’s try and make the league a level playing field and have a draft system?”

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At the moment, it’s easy to imagine the likes of Durham, Leicestershire and Derbyshire welcoming a draft system. The likes of Nottinghamshire, Essex and Surrey would likely be less keen. The upcoming city based franchise system will have a draft pick. I’ve mentioned before how this will impact counties as players from the weaker teams will enjoy the better coaching and facilities at other grounds before possibly seeking a transfer in county cricket. To implement a draft system in county cricket would be radical and anything but traditional. As with my proposals for a restructure of world cricket (Or what I’m now referring to as the Global Cricket League or GCL for short), sometimes potential changes to what has been for many years are worth exploring. I’m not suggesting that a draft pick is the way to go in county cricket but it’s a thought and not beyond the realms of possibility in the future.

This isn’t one of those articles that’s going to be rounded off with a conclusion or whatever formal ending an article should have but as the title indicates, I hope that you enjoyed rambling with me!

27 Tests

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27 Tests. That’s how long it took Australia’s Steve Waugh to record his maiden Test hundred. That’s Steve Waugh, a man who has 10,927 Test runs at an average of 51.06 to his name. Oh and the century tally… 32!

http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/8192.html

Do you think that any England batsmen debuting in the near future will be provided 27 Tests to score their first century?

Keaton Jennings scored one on debut just four Tests ago but already many people seem to want rid of him. Sam Robson then Adam Lyth each recorded a century in their seven (Not 27) Tests but it wasn’t enough to provide them with an extended run in the team.

England don’t really seem to know what they want at the moment, stoic resilience or explosive attacking? The selectors, coach and captain don’t appear to be singing from the same hymn sheet. Captain Joe Root campaigned for Gary Ballance, Dawid Malan clearly appeals to coach Trevor Bayliss, Tom Westley has demanded selection but needed injury to another to receive it and all the while the likes of Mark Stoneman and Daniel Bell-Drummond await their turn, not to mention Ben Duckett, Haseeb Hameed and… Sam Robson, again!

Unless somebody rocks up and averages 65.00+ from the get go and maintains those numbers then the England batting merry go round looks set to continue. I can’t help but think England’s Test summer isn’t structured in the best possible way to get the country’s premier batsmen on the plane to a land Down Under this winter. English willow wielders are currently struggling against a strong South African attack. If they’re dropped then newbies will come in against (No disrespect) a less threatening West Indies attack and surely have an increased chance of doing well but though they may gain confidence from doing so, will facing the likes of Shannon Gabriel, Alzarri Joseph and Miguel Cummins (No disrespect) really prepare them for the Ashes?

We’re five Tests away from the Ashes (If they go ahead?!) and the identity of Alastair Cook’s opening partner and the number three position remain anything from certain. Throw in an injury or some other misfortune to messrs Cook or Root and cue panic among the England selectorial Gods!

Bell ‘n’ Brez Bash it Big!

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England discards Ian Bell and Tim Bresnan led from the front as Perth Scorchers claimed the 2016-17 Big Bash crown in resounding style.

Bresnan recorded figures of 4-0-40-3 as Sydney Sixers stumbled to only 141-9. Bell then saw the Scorchers comfortably over the line with a whopping 25 deliveries to spare, striking 31 not out from 25 balls.

No doubt Bresnan has had a little injury trouble but you would have thought given his experience and past performances in an England shirt that in the free spirited Trevor Bayliss era, England could still find room at least in their limited overs squads for a player possessing his all-round abilities. He seems, like Ravi Bopara, to be a player that having gained plenty of international experience, England just gave up on too soon and decided to start all over again with somebody else. Bresnan was only in the Scorchers squad as a replacement for current England squad member David Willey but the new Yorkshire vice-skipper made a positive impression on the west coast.

As well as Bresnan and Bell there was another Englishman that helped propel the Scorchers to victory. Doncaster born wicketkeeper Sam Whiteman clubbed 41 from just 21 balls including three sixes at the top of the order to jet start the Scorchers pursuit of the Sixers’ below par total. Whiteman moved to Oz aged three and has already represented Australia at various levels. He’s tipped to follow another Yorkshireman, Matthew Renshaw, into the Australian national side.

Another Englishman was involved in today’s final but for Sixers’ opener Michael Lumb, a former Yorkshire player of course, his 15-minute 5-run vigil at the top of the order, an innings that also included the run out of Nic Maddinson, helped the Scorchers more than it did the Sixers. Still, his ODI batting average of 55.00 is superior to both Bell (37.87) and Bresnan (19.79). It’s also higher than Nic Maddinson’s Test average of 6.75!

The Perth franchise’s other star performers in today’s final are at different ends of the playing career spectrum. 36-year-old Gloucestershire run-machine Michael Klinger carried his bat in making 71 not out from just 49 deliveries including five fours and an equal amount of sixes. It seems incredible that Klinger will finish his career without an international cap (We’ll come to that later), incredible but likely, in which case days such as these and 2015’s One-Day cup victory at Lords with Gloucestershire (Although Klinger ducked in the final after a monstrous tournament) will be days to saviour for a fine batsman.

Paceman Jhye Richardson is, at 20, nearly half Klinger’s age. He has just one First Class and only one List A appearance to his name but now has a grand total of nine T20 exposures under his belt. His 3-30 in the final saw him snap up the Man of the Match award and English batsman will surely have to face him at international level in the future.

Both Klinger and Richardson merited a mention in a previous article here at Silly Point about the possible make-up of Australia’s T20I squad for the Sri Lanka series that clashes with the Test series in India…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/01/14/follow-the-yellow-brick-road/

Performances such as those from Richardson and even no spring chicken Klinger, in a match of such magnitude must surely put them in with a chance of making the cut.

Don Bradman Cricket 17: Ireland v England Day/Night Test Match

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With coaches Trevor Bayliss and Paul Farbrace taking some time off after a couple of difficult tours to the sub-continent, I snatched at the chance to take charge of the England cricket team on a part-time basis. I was humbled to lead a Test side to Ireland and for England to be the opponents in our hosts’ first ever Test match, a one-off day/night affair at Malahide. I opted to rest Moeen Ali, Stuart Broad and James Anderson and presented Test caps to county stalwarts James Hildreth and Mark Footitt as well as Footitt’s Surrey teammate, South African born youngster Tom Curran. Following the difficult decision to remove Alastair Cook from the position of captain, Joe Root had the honour of leading the side for our nation’s first ever day/night Test match.

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Having been put into bat by Ireland skipper William Porterfield, we slumped to 36-4 before debutant James Hildreth went about rebuilding the innings. Unfortunately when the Somerset batsman was dismissed for a Ramprakashesque 27, we found ourselves in dire straits at 93-6!

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This isn’t quite how I had envisaged things at the end of day one. Just look at all those Ramprakashes! (That’s slang for 27). We were bowled out just before lunch with only a last wicket stand of 59 between numbers ten (Jake Ball, 27) and eleven (Debutant Mark Footitt, 35 not out), saving face for my troops. Ball and Footitt were actually smacking the ball to all parts and only when, as lunch approached, ‘they decided to bat properly’ did Ball get run out. On the plus side another debutant, Tom Curran, was swinging the ball like… well, a swing, to help make inroads into the Irish batting line-up.

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After a difficult night’s sleep in the team hotel, it was a relief when Jake Ball eventually dismissed Niall O’Brien for 89 early on the second morning. That wicket provided our players with great hope of limiting the first innings defecit…

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… unfortunately we then watched in horror and were powerless as Ireland’s number ten, ex-England Test cap Boyd Rankin (55) led the way in a partnership of 93 with Niall’s brother Kevin. When Ireland finally declared on 439-9 the younger O’Brien brother was left undefeated on 127.

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In our second innings, opening batsmen Haseeb Hameed and Keaton Jennings constructed an attacking partnership as we attempted to eat into the first innings defecit. After racing to 47 without loss Hameed had his stumps rearranged on 26 and almost immediately after that Jennings was caught behind for 20 with both openers falling to our nemesis Rankin. Our middle-order batsmen then struggled to adapt to the pink ball coming at them under lights with Bouncing Boyd in particularly hostile form.

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When Ben Duckett, who seemed to have weathered the worst of the tempest was run out for 35, our hopes had all but faded…

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… but a counter-attacking innings of 46 off 28 deliveries from Adil Rashid gave us hope of avoiding an innings defeat and possibly taking the match into a third day.

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It wasn’t to be however as Ireland ran out comfortable winners by an innings and 37 runs. I haven’t heard from Andrew Strauss and fear that the offer of a full-time position may have been retracted!