Cricket 19: Himalayan Odyssey!

Following an encouraging performance in our one and only warm-up match, we faced off against the mighty India in the foothills of the Himalayas.

We lost the toss and not surprisingly were made to field. Opening batsmen Mayank Agarwal and Rohit Sharma soon took the hosts to 50-0 with little fuss. It’s fair to say that by the time India had collapsed to 55-3 then 90-4 at lunch, a fuss was being made!

All-rounder Zidane Thomas (1-23), entrusted with the new ball following the omission of talisman Alexandre Riviere, made the breakthrough by pinning Agarwal (35) LBW. Teenage spin sensation Mehdi Qadri, fresh from wickets in the tour game, then had Sharma (16) caught behind by Marwan Leroy in his first over. Debutant Louis Petit also struck straight away to announce his arrival to Test cricket in sublime style. The distinctive slow-left-armer claimed the wicket of India captain Virat Kohli for a seven-ball duck as his maiden Test victim… and who should be the catcher? Only his twin brother Enzo!

Cheteshwar Pujara and Ajinkya Rahane steadied things briefly before the Qadri/Leroy combo was at it again to account for Pujara (19).

After the interval, things never got any better for the hosts as they plunged further into the abyss at 135-9. Rahane (13) was ousted by Petit (15-3-28-2) courtesy of sharp work by Smith at slip before Vihari (15) was exquisitely caught by Zvonimir Pitko. Pitko, who has already proven himself to be a handsome fieldsman, was positioned somewhere between silly mid-on and mid-wicket. It was an outrageous take.

Our skipper, Xavier Le Tallec, was demonstrating astute tactical nous having been forced to field first. Risabh Pant (8) was another to succumb to rampant spin sensation Qadri before Ravi Jadeja (22) bedded in. However he was needlessly run out to curtail any fight back from the home side. Ravi Ashwin made a hard-earned 4 from 27 deliveries before edging Martin (1-43) to Chevalier who held the sort of catch that proclaimed “When it’s your day then it’s your day!”. Ishant Sharma (7) and Jasprit Bumrah (13*) frustrated briefly to haul the score to 153 before Qadri (5-56) bowled the former to record the first Test five-wicket haul in our nation’s history.

We then made a tidy start in our attempt to gain a first innings lead before Chevalier (14) edged a brute of a ball from Bumrah to third slip. That left us 24-1 before Petit and Smith really got our innings going. The pair had compiled 43 when India reviewed an LBW appeal against our opener. Despite clear evidence that Petit (29) had got bat on ball the decision was incorrectly overturned. We were 67-2 with drinks upon us and me spewing my cafe au lait!

After beverages we continued to build but regularly had our progress checked. Smith (26) was caught at slip off the bowling of Ashwin and Pitko (13) was turned inside out to be caught at mid-wicket off Ishant Sharma. Thomas (7) struck a maximum only to fall the very next ball. Thomas is developing a habit of batting for a fun time but not a long time. It’s such a waste provided his talent and on this occasion was a naive dismissal so late in the day. From 83-2 we’d stumbled to 136-5 at close of play on a wicket frenzy first day. Come day two a lot would rest on the shoulders of set batsman Youssef Rizvi, fresh from a century in the tour match.

On the second morning Rizvi and Marwan Leroy raised their partnership to 53 before both succumbed to the spin of Ashwin. Having contributed a fifty of his own, Rizvi (57) nicked behind to gloveman Pant before Leroy (42) was trapped on the crease LBW. Rizvi will feel that he could’ve left alone the ball that did for him and Leroy was gutted to fall short of a half-century. When the seventh wicket went down we’d accumulated 200 exactly.

Skipper Le Tallec and debutante Louis Petit upped the score to 268 but the return of Ashwin immediately (And by that I mean immediately!) accounted for Le Tallec (37). It was a welcome contribution from the skipper however after registering only 9 runs in four innings against England. The partnership had lifted our lead to in excess 100.

Qadri (6) didn’t last long. He was LBW to Jadeja and an optimistic review didn’t save him. Last man Louis Martin joined his namesake Petit and batted stoically to help build a frustrating (For the Indians!) last wicket stand. Petit, dropped by Pujara on 44, brought up a half-century on Test debut to go with his excellent bowling display. 299-9 and the lead upto 146 were the details at lunch. At the time, both team’s innings had lasted exactly 60 overs!

After the break the innings was soon curtailed by Ashwin (6-51) when he bowled Martin (7) around his legs but not before we’d passed 300. 302 all out with Petit unbeaten on 53 and a healthy lead of 149 meant that India’s batsmen had plenty of work to do.

India’s openers set about that work and amassed 24 runs without alarm at which point Zidane Thomas outright dismantled Rohit Sharma’s (15) stumps with a ferocious Yorker. It was a magnificent riposte by Thomas after being subjected to online vitriol overnight for his failure with the bat and having experienced an expensive first few overs with the ball. He had however made the vital first breakthrough for the second time in the match. India recovered though to reach 92-1 at tea, 57 from parity.

Agarwal and Pujara pushed on to put India in the lead and extend their partnership past 150 before Thomas intervened once again. He lured Agarwal (93) forward to edge a full delivery to Smith at slip. Smith didn’t need to move and India lost their second wicket with the score on 179, effectively 30-2.

There was then a mid-match patch, the replay function wouldn’t work properly, a deadly virus outbreak, screaming kids and Le Tallec (Well me!) dropping a catch off the bowling of Thomas. India were 211-2 at the conclusion of day two and well placed 62 in the lead.

On day three captain Kohli passed fifty at better than a run-a-ball and Pujara, having lingered in the nineties, brought up a determined and potentially match-defining ton. Having combined for 105 Kohli (70 off 71) was casual when running a third and was dismissed courtesy of a direct hit all the way from the boundary by action man Thomas. Soon after that, Pujara (113) had his middle stump uprooted by Pitko’s (1-15) part-time medium-pace. 315-4 and India 166 in the black was the equation at lunch.

Old habits died hard for India as Vihari (7) was inexplicably run out in just the third over of the middle session. Though gloveman Marwan Leroy ultimately effected the run out, it resulted from yet another throw from that man Zidane! The wicket of Vihari came in a Louis Martin over and in his next the opening bowler tempted Pant (1) into an expansive drive that he dragged onto his stumps. India had slumped from 284-2 to 332-6 but the lead was up to 190.

Rahane and Jadeja resisted before Thomas (3-110) finally claimed his third wicket… better late than never! Despite a hint of leg-side about it Jadeja (19) declined to review having been adjudged LBW. Ashwin (2) then feathered behind off a reinvigorated Martin (3-93) before Big Louis knocked over the stumps of key man Rahane (53).

Just as Sharma (6*) and Bumrah (7) started to frustrate, they completed a run out hat-trick for the second innings. India had fought back superbly but then so had we. Having commenced their second dig 149 runs in deficit they’d gained a lead but collapsed horribly from 284-2 to 390 all out, effectively losing eight wickets for only 106 runs. Curiously, all wickets but run outs in India’s second innings fell to pace bowling. We required 242 to win a Test match for the first time in our nation’s history.

To only the second delivery of our defining run-chase Jean-Luc Chevalier (2) pushed at an inducing full delivery from Bumrah and edged behind to Pant. Enzo Petit and Gilles Smith however raced to a fifty partnership. Immediately upon doing so Petit was adjudged LBW to Sharma but with Chevalier already wasting a review Petit rolled the dice once more. Replays confirmed that the ball was destined to bounce over the stumps and Petit survived, providing some atonement for the appalling first inning decision that he’d suffered. Following said review, India introduced spin in the form of first innings tormentor Ashwin. One over later we were 56-1 at tea still requiring 186 more to send shockwaves throughout the world.

Petit and Smith moved their partnership onto exactly 100 when Smith (41) edged to short leg off the bowling of Ashwin. 102-2, 140 to win!

With 106 runs required Rizvi (22), having looked so at ease at the crease but already fatigued between the wickets, was slow to ground his bat and run out. It had the potential to be a sliding doors moment!

Following Rizvi’s fall, Petit put his foot on the accelerator but a field change distracted him and he heartbreakingly fell short of a ton, bowled for 94, Ashwin (2-64) the bowler responsible. A distraught Petit trudged off to a rapturous applause from fans of both sides but he knew deep down that he hadn’t seen his team over the line. Thomas joined Pitko with the score 167-4 but suddenly 74 more seemed a big ask. Thomas promptly despatched his first ball for six to relieve some tension. Getting stumped off his second delivery (Jadeja 1-36) however brought all that tension right back!

Pitko and Leroy (6) steadied the leaking if not quite sinking ship before Bumrah was brought back into the attack. Leroy’s eyes lit up when Bumrah (2-74) served up a short ball first thing but the young wicketkeeper got his attempted pull all wrong, only ballooning the ball skyward before the slip fielder took the catch when it came back down to Earth. 191-6, 51 still required to win.

From there, the ultra-composed Zvonimir Pitko and captain Le Tallec compiled fifty exactly to level the scores. Pitko (49*) was cruelly denied a fifty of his own but how fitting that our captain, Xavier Le Tallec (19*), should score the winning run.

The match had ebbed and flowed like all great Test matches should. We’d made history and President Macron was on the phone before the players had even left the field. Emotion ran high among the playing squad and support staff. Many a tear was shed. Meanwhile back home people danced in the streets of Paris, Nantes, Lyon and beyond. Cricket was headline news on French TV. Children in the parks of Lille, Rennes and Montpellier wanted to pick up a bat and ball. Cricket had entered the French psyche on an unimaginable scale as an ex-teacher, plasterer and more than one university drop out amongst others had put India to the sword and placed French cricket firmly on the map. Forget Platini, Mauresmo and Prost (Well don’t forget them!) and remember Qadri, Petit, Le Tallec and co. There’s a second Test in Delhi to come but for now let’s saviour victory in the Himalayas!

Disclaimer: Apologies for the image quality… long story, various excuses!

Cricket 19: Indian Odyssey – Partie Un

Tour of India

T20 Warm-up match (Delhi)

France 138

La Roux 39*, L Petit 24, Le Tallec 23/Ashwin 3-10, Tye 3-17, Ur Rahman 3-37

Punjab 139-3

Gayle 71, Agarwal 30*/L Petit 2-25, La Roux 1-38

Lost by 7 wickets

img_9833

1st T20I (Delhi)

France 166

Thomas 50, Chevalier 41, Gregory 29/Jadhav 6-16

India 167-4

Iyer 74*, Pandey 39*/Thomas 1-33, La Roux 1-34, Le Tallec 1-35

Lost by 6 wickets

We were 117-1 and India were 21-3!

2nd T20I (Dehradun)

France 112

Pitko 33, L Petit 32*/Chahar 5-20

India 113-0

Dhawan 63*, Sharma 50*/ Georges 0-22

Lost by 10 wickets

We dropped two catches that the game didn’t allow me to try and catch!

3rd T20I (Dehradun)

France 147-9

Martinez 42, Le Tallec 33, Phillipe 21/Bumrah 2-12, Pandya 2-30, Chahar 2-31

India 148-3

Dhawan 57*, Kohli 48, Iyer 32*/L Petit 2-15, La Roux 1-22

Lost by 7 wickets

India win the three match T20I series 3-0

Cricket Captain 2018: Afghan Dreams Can Come True!

Screen Shot 2018-07-19 at 18.41.34

When I accepted the challenge of performing the dual role of National Selector and Coach, ultimately being Team Manager for the Afghanistan Men’s National Cricket team, though I knew that a new dawn was about to commence, little did I envisage that the players would be writing history on such a grand scale so early in our relationship.

Having lost a competitive T20I series against Bangladesh 2-1, even if the deciding match looked a little one sided, we headed to India for my adopted nation’s first ever Test match. When a Kohliless India won the toss and chose to bat on the first morning, the following eleven men became Afganistan’s first ever Test cricket team:

Ashgar Stanikzai (c), Mohammad Shahzad, Usman Ghani, Noor Ali Zadran, Rahmat Shah, Mohammad Nabi, Haji Murad (w), Hamza Hotak, Dawlat Zadran, Fareem Ahmad, Hameed Hassan

By the time India neared 100 without loss on the first day, romance had been replaced by reality on our Test debut. With the score on 97 however, Shikhar Dhawan was run out for fifty exactly. That leaves a tricky quiz question regarding who took Afghanistan’s first ever Test wicket. When Cheteshwar Pujara perished for 91, the second wicket to fall, it was left-arm quick Fareem Ahmad who claimed the honour of being the first Afghanistan bowler to take a wicket.

India closed the day on 268-3 and though we lacked penetration, we had contained our hosts and not yet allowed them to amass a terribly imposing total. On the second day, India progressed to 326-3 before Ahmad (3-127) led the fightback to restrict them to 444 all out. As well as Pujara’s 91 and Dhawan’s 50, Murali Vijay contributed a determined 90.

Our batsmen were not to be intimidated however. Mohammad Shahzad (29) and Usman Ghani (60) put on 83 for our first ever Test partnership. Rahmat Shah, who didn’t feature in the Bangladesh matches, followed Dhawan’s example by scoring 50 exactly. Making India bat again had looked a certainty but a little middle order wobble caused concern. It was left to 29-year-old debutant wicketkeeper Haji Murad to come to the rescue. Before the match, I’d decided that it was far too much to ask even a player as talented as Mohammad Shahzad to both open the batting and keep wicket. I didn’t want him wasted down the order though, so I insisted that he reside at the top of the order. That left a difficult choice as to who to select behind the stumps. There was some reticence when I selected an uncapped (In all international formats) nearly thirty-year-old to gatecrash the big occasion. Oh how it turned out though! Murad made an assured 45 alongside Dawlat Zadran (53) in a magnificent partnership of 90 for the eighth wicket to help us avoid the follow-on. Zadran had been disappointed not to play in the T20Is against Bangladesh and responded by making vital contributions throughout his country’s first ever Test match. His attacking 53, which included seven fours and a six, was his highest score at any level while Ravi Ashwin claimed strong figures of 5-97 for India.

India then wasted a promising start for the second time in the match when 213-3 became 296 all out. Shikhar Dhawan top scored with 89 while Ajinkya Rahane made 52. There were contributions from all our bowlers including part-time spinner Rahmat Shah. Shah claimed a crestfallen Karun Nair for just 8 to the last ball of the day in his first over. Perhaps the most crucial wicket to fall however would be that of Umesh Yadav. Yadav was forced to retire hurt first ball and would not be able to bowl when we came to bat second time around.

Screen Shot 2019-02-17 at 20.53.51

We were set 413 to win, just five short of the highest run chase in Test history. Rahane surprisingly opened the bowling but was ineffectual alongside an expensive Ishant Sharma. Sharma (18-0-92-0) conceded his runs at in excess of five an over. Mohammad Shahzad (148) and Usman Ghani (83) put on 163 for the first wicket. Shahzad also compiled 106 with Noor Ali Zadran to take us to 269-1 and make the entire cricket world turn their heads and believe in the impossible. Even a cricketer as exuberant as Shahzad was restrained in his celebrations upon scoring his country’s first ever Test match hundred. He knew that although his innings was special, it could yet be part of something incredible. There was a wobble as India opened the door. 304-2 became 373-7 resulting in a nervy tea for our boys on the fifth and final day.

Debutant Haji Murad (21) played his part again but it would be captain Ashgar Stanikzai (57 not out) who would write the script. He put on an unbroken 41 with Zadran and had the honour of hitting the winning cover drive for four to seal an earth-shattering victory that sent shockwaves throughout the cricket world and announced Afghanistan on the Test stage.

Screen Shot 2019-02-17 at 20.53.39

Credit to India for their grace in defeat. The absence of their captain and of a member of their bowling attack in our second innings proved fatal but for Ravi Jadeja to bowl only eight overs in the entire match was criminal. I take little credit for this victory. I have been with the boys for only a short time and they are a truly talented bunch. It is they who performed and etched their place in cricketing history. Their names and their exploits will be spoken about in a hundred years time. Whatever happens in their careers from this point forth, they will always have the first Test against India to reflect upon with immeasurable pride.

Disclaimer: Don’t ask me how Dhawan robbed Shahzad of Man of the Match!

A Fix of 26! (But not that sort of fix!)

Australia’s latest opening batsman is twenty-six-year-old Marcus Harris. Fittingly, he scored 26 in both innings of his Test debut against Kohli & co. It’s a good job that he’s not a one-year-old!

India will expect to assume a 1-0 series lead provided their current position of superiority.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/18693/game/1144993/australia-vs-india-1st-test-india-in-aus-2018-19

Given Australia’s penchant for changing their opening batsmen, Harris will have to do better than a pair of twenty-sixes to retain his position for next year’s Ashes series in England.

The Kohli Conundrum

IMG_2940 4

India skipper Virat Kohli has joined Surrey at The Oval for the month of June. Kohli will play both County Championship and One-Day Cup matches ahead of leading India on their Test tour of England.

Some people may moan about a player who will be opposing England being able to acclimatise to the conditions and I’ve previously shared that opinion. However, as Test cricket continues to become home team dominated, the opportunity to enhance the chances of an even contest is perhaps not a bad thing. England have had positive but one-sided results against Asian opposition when playing in almost winter conditions that are alien to the tourists, though admittedly this series is scheduled for summer rather than spring. England themselves have often been undercooked when touring and simply not been prepped to perform. Kohli, as well as others such as Yorkshire’s Cheteshwar Pujara, will hopefully be primed to provide even England fans with the sort of quality and contest that they pay for, whether that’s on telly or at the ground.

Kohli has committed for an entire month which I think is fair too. In light of an international cricketer’s schedule, it can’t be expected that the top players can participate for an entire campaign. I don’t like to see players signing for just a couple of weeks or representing multiple counties but First Class cricket in England desperately requires some aces to draw the crowds.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/india/content/player/253802.html

I might even sneak him into my Telegraph fantasy team!

Antarctic T20 Ice Blast! (Silly Point Ultra-Exclusive Story!)

1448adj 2

Cricket’s administrators recently proposed suggestions to help preserve Test cricket. This was in part due to the potential risk of some billionaire creating yet another global T20 franchise tournament and stealing players. Well those moves may have come too late because an unnamed mogul is rumoured to be ready to inject millions into the launching of a new T20 competition. The Antarctic Ice Blast is believed to be prepped for launch as early and appropriately as 2020. Like the identity of the league’s founder, the potential franchise owners remain unknown though TV’s Jon Snow, former Netherlands footballer Arron Winter and New Zealand cricketer Tim Southee are all rumoured to have put down a deposit. Silly Point has however seen the names of the proposed teams and they are as follows:

Bentley Subglacial Trench EmperorsLake Vostok LakersMcMurdo Station PinnipedsMount Erebus MountaineersOnyx River NematodesRiiser-Larsen Ice Shelf IcefishRoss Island Seals and Vinson Massif Explorers.

Englishmen Samit Patel, Ravi Bopara and Joe Denly are all rumoured to have signed up for the inaugural draft as is Test captain Joe Root. There is even a suggestion that recently retired Kevin Pietersen may come out of retirement for one last Blast. English players are perceived to be a vital addition to the franchises because of their experience of playing in cold conditions. Northerners in particular, players from the likes of Durham, Yorkshire and Lancashire are particularly sought after. Franchise owners are rumoured to have been dialling the mobile numbers of Steve Harmison, Darren Gough and Andrew Flintoff in audacious bids to lure the former England trio out of retirement.

West Indies’ Chris Gayle and Kieron Pollard, Indian skipper Virat Kohli, Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi, Afghanistan’s Rashid Khan and Australia’s Michael Klinger as well as former national skipper Steve Smith, are also rumoured to have put their names forward for the first draft. With Silly Point having seen exclusive advertising, we can advise that former Italy all-rounder Gareth Berg has already emerged as the league’s poster boy. Soon it’ll be hard to move around London Underground, Sydney Business District or the streets of Mumbai without seeing Berg’s flop of blond hair, his arms folded, in front of a mass of ice and a set of stumps… made of ice! That’s right, they’ll be replaced every time they’re broken or maybe they’re unbreakable ice!

It’s understood that the Blast’s benefactor is willing to contribute funds towards the building of renewable energy laden environmentally friendly stadiums for each franchise. These stadiums will have both training and accommodation facilities as well as purpose built wickets. Retractable roofs will come as standard.

Again, Silly Point has gained exclusive access to information and the names of the stadiums are set to be as follows:

Bentley Ballpark, Vostok Park, McMurdo Station, Erebus Arena, Onyx Bowl, Riiser-Larsen Cricket Ground (RLCG), Ross Dome and Vinson Field

The league’s creator is also set to launch their own airline, Antarctic Fantastic Air, to assist fans when travelling to matches.

Some in the cricket world are sceptical regarding the prospect of yet another T20 league in an already congested calendar, about the less than desirable cricket weather and how exactly fans will attach themselves to a team. For some though this is seen an excellent advert for spreading the global appeal of the game. Given the reduction of teams at the 2019 ODI World Cup, many cricket lovers as well as administrators are delighted to see cricket venture into an untapped market. The ICC are already lining up Antarctica as host for both an ODI World Cup and T20 World Cup as well as Champions Trophy venue post 2030.

One frustrating thing about the proposed tournament is that it’s expected to be played out behind a TV pay wall. Rumours are that the competition will have its own channel and will cost a one-off fee of around £250.00 before requiring subscribers to enter a 20 digit code followed by another 20 digit code on their remote control. Pommie Mbangwa, Michael Slater and everybody’s favourite insighter Graeme Swann, are tipped to be among the commentary and punditry team. Instagram and Dave are believed to have exclusive rights to highlights packages whilst if you sign up with the league founder’s rumoured planned new mobile phone company, Antarctic Connexions Mobile, you can gain exclusive access to almost immediate video wicket alerts! Continuing on the screen front, renowned film maker Werner Herzog is set to return to Antarctica and shoot a documentary about the competition’s inception, infancy and general learning to walk.

With some international teams still reluctant to travel to Pakistan for security reasons, Pakistan are rumoured to have already enquired about the possibility of playing home matches there following some disappointing results in UAE conditions. English county side Hampshire are said to be extremely frustrated to have missed out to Antarctica as an English Test venue. Because of the technicalities of Antarctic ownership, it’s understood that all nations could potentially play home games in Antarctica if they wish. Boyd Rankin, Ed Joyce and Johan Botha are believed to have already relocated to the southern continent in order to meet residency requirements ahead of rumoured bids to join the Antarctic national team. Peter Moores is slated as coach… slated, he will be if results don’t go too well! Essex are believed to have enquired about whether players, hell just people, could join them on Kolpak deals as soon as this summer.

Silly Point is delighted to present this exclusive story to you and will keep our loyal followers abreast of any further developments.

Don Bradman Cricket 17: Career Catastrophe!

img_2248

Firstly, yes that is me in the image above. The disadvantage of being a rather nondescript looking person in real life is that amongst other things any avatar that you create, in this case the Don Bradman Cricket 17 version of yourself, is that you don’t look particularly far removed from the default character. I look like I need a good meal, maybe I should have beefed up my chest and shoulders a bit.

Anyway, you know that game I’ve been banging on about for weeks, Don Bradman Cricket 17 (Yeah that one) and telling everyone to buy it… well hold your horses! At the risk of sounding like a proper gamer, there are bugs and glitches galore (I know all the terminology now).

Having made it to 10 not out in the first game of my career I suddenly looked up at the screen to see myself stood at the non-striker’s end. The problem was that I wasn’t the non-striker and despite a desperate (In fact I didn’t even bother!) effort to get back I got stumped. The same thing happened a few matches later but as it was a pace bowler and the wicketkeeper was stood back I managed to scramble home. After all this chaos seemed to have stopped it later happened again but fortunately for my batting average my teammate was the one short of his ground!

IMG_2931

Art imitating life.

In career mode you start at T20 club level. You can’t just waltz into the Yorkshire side. I signed up for Leeds and was asked to select some other local club sides to join the league. I chose Doncaster, Hull, Scarborough, Sheffield and York so was a bit miffed when I found myself playing the likes of Consett, Southport and Outer Vietnam or whoever else was in the Northern League.

Earlier in the day I played a women’s Five5 match then two men’s games in the same format. Two of the three matches kicked me out of the game at the innings break.

IMG_2931

That’s me on the left (Yeah I’m walking off not out!)

All of this is a great shame because the gameplay is great. I’ve seen others criticise the graphics but some of the catches are far better looking than DBC14. If only the fielders would take some off my bowling! The only other game I play is FIFA so I can’t really compare against much but I think it’s an amazing achievement for people to have made cricket playable on a computer and hopefully after a patch (There’s that gamer terminology again!) DBC17 can become the great game that it should be.

IMG_2931

Have some of that! (A nose bleed inducing strike rate if such preposterousness were to occur in real life!)

Oh! I nearly forgot. It wouldn’t let me download the Academy so there’s no Virat Kohli or Kagiso Rabada etc. I’m stuck with Vincent Krohl and Kingston Radebe or whatever wonderful names Big Ant have provided…

… and on the subject of names it was a pleasure to bowl to Mr Sod Wesley, even if he did smack me for back to back fours on the leg-side!

IMG_2931

A cheeky little not out in my final innings of the season sent that average soaring skywards (Or towards 20!).

P.S. Proper YouTubers etc would provide smooth images and video of the experience. I am not proper so you will have to make do with actual photos taken using an actual camera that was held in one hand whilst the PS4 controller was in the other and let me tell you, this game is hard enough with two hands on the controller…

… “wide. That ball was headed for the car park”. (Again!)