Six to Watch: T20I Status – Team Special

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Following my article regarding players in the men’s game to look out for come T20I status being applied to all associate nations, here’s a Six to Watch Team Special…

Argentina

The South American side used to benefit from regular visits from touring MCC sides and therefore played First Class fixtures. They’ve appeared in the ICC Trophy but have slipped off the ICC World Cricket League structure so it’ll be interesting to see what route back to cricket recognition they can take.

Canada

The inaugural Global T20 Canada kicks off this month, complete with the usual T20 franchise brigade, Chris Gayle, Steven Smith and Shahid Afridi included.

https://www.gt20.ca

It’s to be hoped that the competition ignites interest amongst the local community in The Land of Maple Leaf. Canada have had their moments in cricket history, most notably when John Davison smacked a record-breaking century at the 2003 World Cup.

They’ve also had some shockers though, including being dismissed for 36 by Sri Lanka in the same tournament. They were also routed for 45 against England in 1979. Canada will be relying on expats for now but hopefully native Canadians will be inspired to take up the game and break into the national side.

Denmark

Not that long ago Denmark were one of the there or there about nations beyond the Test world. Their place on the cricket scene was somewhat akin to how Netherlands have been in the past couple of decades. Players such as Ole Mortensen and Freddie Klokker appeared on the county circuit with Mortensen averaging just 23.88 with the ball in the First Class game. When Demark defeated Israel by all ten wickets at the 1994 ICC Trophy, Mortensen claimed figures of 7-19! They’ve somewhat fallen away since, though former England Test player Amjad Khan has helped them return to prominence in recent years. Expats are almost vital to developing cricket in the associate nations but it’s great to see some young local talent in the Denmark squad. Danish born Klokker who was on the books of both Warwickshire and Derbyshire tends to don the gloves these days and his county experience complete with First Class hundreds will be vital if the Danes are to be great again!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederik_Klokker

Fiji

In bygone years Fiji benefited from their proximity to Australia. They even toured Oz and hosted New Zealand as well as been regulars in the ICC Trophy. In recent years they’ve been well down the ICC World Cricket League spectrum, falling as low as division seven. Their squad is full of indigenous talent including many players still in their teens.

When Fiji defeated Wellington in a First Class fixture in 1948, it was the man with the longest name (IL Bula) in cricket history who led the way with 88 in Fiji’s second innings to set the Pacific islanders up for a heart-pumping one-wicket win…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/review2012/content/player/24046.html

Rwanda

Rwanda have put a lot of effort into raising the profile of cricket in their country and if for no other reason than their cricket ground is so beautiful then it’s to be hoped that they can join the African forces to be reckoned with.

Captain Eric Dusingizimana famously broke a world record with an epic fifty-one hour net session.

http://www.rcsf.org.uk

South Korea

South Korea have played at the Asian Games but looked like they’d have made a good ODI side ten years ago. Technically correct they’ll need to adapt their skills to T20I cricket. The talent and hunger is there and it’d be great to see a side from the Far East come to the fore in the cricket world. Maybe some of their players can have great Koreas (Careers!)… sorry!

On the subject of Associate Cricket, Roy Morgan’s Real International Cricket: A History in One Hundred Scorecards is well, well worth reading. Tim Brooks’ Cricket On the Continent as well as Second XI: Cricket in it’s Outposts by Tim Wigmore and Peter Miller are also essential reads for the Associate fan.

White Ferns Call on Kerr to Curb Run Flow

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New Zealand Women have selected teenage spin bowler Amelia Kerr in their World Cup squad for the tournament that commences next month in England. The Wellington Wizard was just fourteen years of age when she popped up on YouTube, the great hope for New Zealand Women’s cricket. Of course courting such attention at that age can have a detrimental effect (Freddy Adu anybody?). Kerr though has clocked up ten wickets in 7 ODIs to date, at an average of just 22.90. The Wellington native has already claimed two four-wicket hauls in those 7 appearances and gone at less than four runs per over, 3.89 to be precise.

There’s something utterly bizarre about looking at a person’s Cricinfo profile page and seeing a birthday in the 2000s!

http://www.espncricinfo.com/newzealand/content/player/803971.html

Here’s a Trans World Sport feature on the leg-spinner who can bat too. She struck 119 for Wellington Women against Otago Women as recently as February.

Cricket runs in the Kerr family. Amelia’s sister plays alongside her at domestic level, both parents played the game and grandfather Bruce Murray clocked up 13 Test caps for the Black Caps. Murray’s career best 90 came in Lahore when New Zealand beat Pakistan for the first time.

http://www.howstat.com/cricket/Statistics/Matches/MatchScorecard.asp?MatchCode=0663

That was nearly half a century ago. Kerr will hope to create some historic moments of her own in the sport in the years and even decades to come.

Disclaimer: Irrelevant lyrics, relevant title!

All Broom but no Handle!

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It’s been a while since Neil Broom got a mention here at Silly Point. The New Zealand bat gained some airtime when he ditched a county contract to answer a recall to his nation’s limited overs side and promptly topped the run charts with 228 over the three-match series against Bangladesh. This included a maiden international hundred (109 not out in Nelson) followed by a run-a-ball 97, also in Horatio’s city.

Broom did register a score of 73 against Australia but in the absence of Ross Taylor, greeted the Test world off the back of a ODI series against South Africa that brought him scores of 2, 2 and 0, so it probably didn’t come as a surprise to many when he lasted only four runless deliveries against the same opposition in the second Test in Wellington, Rabada-de Kock the combination responsible for his downfall. For those of you missing our old favourite…

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… here’s an International Duck Watch special just for you, courteousy of Neil Broom!

International Duck Watch!

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In a Test match in Wellington…

… just when you think that you’ve got no work to do, teenage sensation Mehedi Hasan falls to the very last ball of the day, courtesy of some very composed bowling from Neil Wagner!

In a Test match in Johannesburg…

… Temba Bavuma is starting to become a regular in this column and his continued selection will surely only heighten scepticism of South Africa’s selection policy. Rather surprisingly, our loyal club member Suranga Lakmal has so far been unable to get in on the action, leaving the work to Nuwan Pradeep. Pradeep was also responsible for the fall of a runless Vernon Philander who himself was then responsible for the fall of a runless Dimuth Karunaratne

In an ODI in Brisbane…

… Steven Smith, first ball. Mohammad Amir the bowler responsible. Serial Test run struggler Matthew Wade hit a run a ball 100 not out. Following our update on Michael Carberry yesterday, here’s another example of a cancer survivor providing inspiration to many.

Oh and a little extra. Though this column isn’t called International Double-Century Watch, Bangladesh’s Shakib Al Hasan surely merits some recognition for his 217 against New Zealand, ably supported by Mushfiqur Rahim’s 159. Bangladesh seem to be holding it together a bit more in Tests at the moment than they do in the pyjama matches.

Another String to Australia’s Bowe!

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Liam Bowe will play for Australia.

There, I’ve said it. Based on three overs in a T20 game, I think that nineteen-year-old slow-left-armer Liam Bowe will represent Australia. I want to put this out there so that in five or even ten years time when I’m proved correct, I can direct people to this post dated 10th January 2017.

Just look at his Cricinfo profile page. It is a thing of beauty in that there is currently no information on there that I couldn’t have told you myself…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/1076852.html

On Big Bash debut today playing for the Melbourne Stars, bespectacled Bowe claimed figures of 1-21 from three overs, his victim was the Adelaide Strikers versatile Ben Dunk. Having bowled two overs early in the piece his only bad ball was the first one of his second spell. Bowe arrowed the ball in at the batsmen on the full but with varying pace and looked completely in control of what he was doing. I’ll say it again. Liam Bowe will play for Australia. Don’t let me down Liam!

Another player that I’m going to back for international honours for the Ozzies is twentytwo-year-old opening batsman Jake Weatherald. Eleven runs from nine deliveries and a pretty ugly shot to get out might not seem like the sort of thing to get the pulses racing but based on what I saw this morning I’d put Jake Weatherald in the same category as somebody like Sam Curran. I think that he’s too good for T20 cricket. That’s not to say that I have a total disdain for T20 or that the best players in that format aren’t skilled but you should know by now that I’m a purist. Weatherald is a touch player and ran some good ones and twos today but due to the format he felt it necessary to attempt a big shot. Without the need to do so, he looks to me like a player that, if he can occupy the crease for extended periods of time can construct innings of magnitude. A quick glance at his Cricinfo profile page appears to back me up…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/player/781285.html

In nine First Class outings the left-hander already has a century to his name and a healthy average of 44.06 complimented by a strike rate of 60.75. In List A cricket he averages 47.33 with a top score of 141 at a strike rate of 108.81. That strike rate suggests that Weatherald can put his foot on the gas when he’s in and though I’m not expecting consistency in the T20 game in the immediate future, I still think that he’s capable of adapting and becoming a player of value in the shortest format, like I did for my team last year!

You may be wondering why I’m randomly putting forward a couple of names for international selection for Australia. Well the big flaw in my whole cricketing blogosphere is the lack of cricket that I actually see but what better way to spend a week off from work than watching some Big Bash action. Commercials appear after every over and after the fall of a wicket, not in-between every delivery like that time I watched the IPL on ITV4.

A word of advice to Ricky Ponting. When playing the cut shot, no I’m only joking. Don’t say things like “I texted him in the car last night” on global TV without specifying that you were either a passenger or parked!

Another player that I’m going to tout for an Ozzie call-up or a recall even is Marcus Stoinis. Yes he plays with his hair a lot, chews his gum voraciously and looks disturbingly like Jade Dernbach (Whose night out in Wellington buddy Evan Gulbis didn’t look too shabby either!), oh and only scored 1 run after recording figures of 0-28 from four overs but I saw enough in his bowling (First Class ave: 49.13, seriously, where are you going with this Paul?!) to think that with the right words in his ear, he could have something to offer. At 27 now though, he needs to get a move on and put together contributions of substance.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/player/325012.html

On to Gulbis, his stats are solid but unspectacular…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/381183.html

… and he kind of looked like a guy you’d play with in your local league who just rocked up to the Big Bash and said, not in a nasty way, “I’m playing tonight guys, alright?”.

He bowled effective bouncers without looking like he was trying too and his six off the immensely impressive Ish Sodhi was as cleanly struck shot as you’ll see, even if he did run out Kevin Pietersen the next ball. To be fair to Gulbis, the two was just about on and he made it there and back.

Back to his stats, his First Class career best of 229 is his sole hundred and a batting average of 24.35 is just weird for someone that has a double-century to their name. He suffers from the usual Australian domestic cricketer syndrome in that despite being thirty years of age, he just hasn’t played that much top-flight cricket (Career Apps: FC: 20, LA: 33, T20: 30). A quick scroll down on the ever reliable Cricinfo tells us that he didn’t debut domestically until the age of 25 and the pros of a club to state system have been seriously questioned in recent times as the national side continue to provide debuts to thirty somethings.

Wes Agar had a tough baptism for the Strikers (3-0-36-0) and in truth, his captain Brad Hodge should have had the courage to take him off, even after he only conceded a single in his second over, having gone for sixteen in his first.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/959833.html

He should however be a better player for the experience and has done well in the few List A games that he has played.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/959833.html

Ben Laughlin (3-19) looked like a player who could have won more than five ODI and three T20I caps but at the time when he was in the international mix the competition was a lot fiercer. A First Class bowling average of 60.45 probably didn’t help. You do wonder what players like Laughlin, who last played First Class cricket as far back as 2012 when aged just thirty, would be doing without the Big Bash.

Well there you go Australia. There’s some hunches from an unqualified talent identifier who thought that Jimmy Ormond was destined to take 200 Test wickets for England!

Extras

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The second instalment of our new little feature where we cram a few articles or shorts into one…

Bye: This article by Tim Wigmore…

http://www.espncricinfo.com/review2016/content/story/1073177.html

Leg Bye: The Japanese batsman that walked off the ground to change their bat only they didn’t request the umpire’s permission so were promptly dismissed ‘retired out’. They were on seven at the time. A lesson to all young cricketer’s out there!
No Ball: D’arcy Short smacking 61 from 29 deliveries on his Big Bash debut for Hobart Hurricanes. A rare example of an Australian cricketer with actual aborigine heritage making waves on the professional circuit. He made his List A debut way back in 2011 but only made his First Class and T20 debuts this season. As is so often the case down under, at 26, he’s only just making his way in the game. Some in Australia have been critical recently of the ageing Test debutant (Hussey, Voges, Ferguson).
If their players aren’t making their domestic debuts until they’re 26 (Short isn’t a one-off) then what do they expect?
Wide: Doesn’t end Well-ington for Dernbach! Everybody’s favourite England cricketer (And his own!) Jade Dernbach, has been dropped form the Wellington team after a late night and has since engineered a return to England. His chances of an England recall (Ha!) have surely gone up in smoke!